Tuesday, January 15, 2013

PIA Cargo Rates Pakistan International Airline

Government of Pakistan Ministry of Commerce
Study on Creation / Improvement of Cargo
Handling Facilities at Airports in Pakistan



Syed Irtiqa Ahmed Zaidi

National Consultant(UNDP-TIHP)

Ministry of Commerce

Islamabad





Javaid Mansoor

Executive Secretary (NTTFC)

Ministry of Commerce

Karachi





September 01, 2006


Acknowledgement

The study team acknowledges with thanks the support and information provided by the
stakeholders such as officials of Civil Aviation Authority, Export Promotion Bureau,
Federal Bureau of Statistics, Pakistan Customs, Pakistan Revenue Automation Ltd.,
Pakistan Horticultural Development and Export Board, Gwadar Development Authority,
Gwadar Port Authority, Karachi Port Trust, Port Qasim Authority, Pakistan International
Airlines, Shaheen Airport Services, Gerry’s Dnata, DHL Services, Sialkot International
Airport, Federation of Pakistan Chambers of Commerce and Industry, Pakistan
International Freight Forwarders Association, Air Cargo Agents Association of Pakistan,
Pakistan Bedwear Exporters Association, Karachi Chamber of Commerce and Industry,
Lahore Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Islamabad Chamber of Commerce and
Industry, Rawalpindi Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Sialkot Chamber of
Commerce and Industry, Faisalabad Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Multan
Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Sarhad Chamber of Commerce and Industry,
Chamber of Commerce and Industry Quetta, and Gwadar Chamber of Commerce and
Industry for preparation of this report.



Disclaimer

The views expressed in this report are those of the authors or cited sources and do not
necessarily reflect the views of the Ministry of Commerce, Government of Pakistan.


Abbreviations and Acronyms



ACAAP Air Cargo Agents Association of Pakistan

AFU Air Freight Unit

ASF Airport Security Force

CAA Civil Aviation Authority
CAR Central Asian Republics


CARE Customs Administrative Reforms

CCIQ Chamber of Commerce and Industry Quetta

EPB Export Promotion Bureau

FBS Federal Bureau of Statistics

FPCCI Federation of Pakistan Chamber of Commerce and Industry

GCCI Gwadar Chamber of Commerce and Industry

GDA Gwadar Development Authority

GPA Gwadar Port Authority

IATA International Air Transport Association

ICCI Islamabad Chamber of Commerce and Industry

KPT Karachi Port Trust

LCCI Lahore Chamber of Commerce and Industry

MCCI Multan Chamber of Commerce and Industry

NTCIP National Trade Corridor Implementation Programme

PACCS Pakistan Customs Computerized System

PHDEB Pakistan Horticultural Development and Export Board

PIA Pakistan International Airlines

PMD Pakistan Meteorological Department

PQA Port Qasim Authority

PRAL Pakistan Revenue Automation Ltd.

SCCI Sarhad Chamber of Commerce and Industry
RCCI Rawalpindi Chamber of Commerce and Industry
SAPS Shaheen Airport Services Ltd.


SBP State Bank of Pakistan

SCCI Sialkot Chamber of Commerce and Industry

SIAL Sialkot International Airport (Pvt) Ltd.

TIHP Trade Initiatives from Human Development Perspective

UNDP United Nation Development Programme




Contents

Page

Acknowledgement..............................................................................................................1

Disclaimer...........................................................................................................................1

Abbreviations and Acronyms.............................................................................................2

Contents..............................................................................................................................3

Executive Summary............................................................................................................4

1. Introduction.....................................................................................................................9

2. International Trade of Pakistan.....................................................................................10

3. Transport of Cargo by Air.............................................................................................13

4. Jinnah International Airport, Karachi...........................................................................17

5. Allama Iqbal International Airport, Lahore..................................................................24

6. Islamabad International Airport....................................................................................29

7. Peshawar International Airport ………………………………………...…………34



8. Sialkot International Airport.........................................................................................38

9. Multan International Airport.........................................................................................40

10. Faisalabad International Airport.................................................................................42

11. Quetta International Airport........................................................................................44

12. Gwadar International Airport......................................................................................46

13. Air Cargo Business Process........................................................................................51

14. Recommendations.......................................................................................................53

Annex-I.............................................................................................................................56
Annex-II …………………………………………………………………………………57


Annex-III ………………………………………………………………………………...58





Executive Summary



The exports of Pakistan have grown from US$ 9.135 billion in 2001-02 to US$ 16.469
billion in 2005-06 at an average annual rate of 15.9%. During the same period the
imports have increased at even faster rate of 28.9% from US$ 10,340 billion to US$
28.581 billion. To overcome the increasing trade gap the government is adopting all
measures to encourage growth in exports.



About 95% trade of Pakistan is carried out by sea. However, expensive articles,
perishable goods and items requiring quick delivery are sent by air in spite of much
higher freight rates. Although in terms of weight the share of exports sent by air is about
1.3%, in value terms it is estimated to be about 8%.



There are 42 civil airports in Pakistan, out of which 10 are categorized as international
airports. The share of cargo handled at these airports during 2004-05 is shown in Table
1.1. Considering the volume of cargo handled by them and the potential for future growth
the following were selected for the study:



.. Karachi

.. Lahore




.. Islamabad

.. Peshawar




.. Faisalabad

.. Multan



.. Quetta

.. Gwadar



The share of cargo handled at these airports during 2004-05 is shown in Table 1.1.



Table 1.1: Share of Cargo Handled during 2004-05

(Percent)
AirportInternationalDomesticTotalKarachi58.36147.41954.634Lahore24.29129.27125.988Islamabad13.13317.01014.454Peshawar4.0782.5183.546Multan0.0981.2580.493Faisalabad0.0061.0800.372Quetta0.0321.2890.461Gwadar0.0010.0600.021Turbat0.0000.0940.032Pasni0.0000.0070.002Total100100100

Source: CAA



Construction of Sialkot airport is nearing completion and will commence cargo
operations in 2007. This airport was also surveyed to explore its potential.



Considering the growth of air traffic it is estimated that the total air cargo will increase
from about 330,000 tonnes in 2004-05 to about 866,000 tonnes in 2015-16.



The main constraint on volume of cargo lifted from the airports is the capacity and
number of aircrafts operating from there. The facilities at the airports affect the efficiency
with which the cargo is handled and processed. Capacity to lift the cargo can be
increased only by attracting more airlines to operate their services. It has been pointed
out by the stakeholders that the foreign airlines are not attracted to call at Pakistani
airports because of the relatively high landing charges and the fuel prices.




The main purpose of sending cargo by air is to ensure expeditious delivery of cargo.
Security of air flights has now become a major concern. In case of cargo not being
scanned or physically checked against explosives it is required to be detained at the
airport for 24 hours cooling period, which defeats the purpose of sending the cargo by
air. Physical examination causes damage and makes the goods liable for pilferage.
Modern cargo scanning equipment capable of detecting explosives has therefore
become an essential requirement for handling of cargo at the airports. Most of the
airports lack this.



Cargo handling terminals, especially those of Pakistan International Airlines (PIA), do not
have adequate capacity for handling the cargo. At present PIA transports over 50% of
the air cargo. Special attention is needed to expand and modernize the cargo terminals
at Karachi, Islamabad and Peshawar.



There is demand from the exporters for cold rooms to be provided for transport of
perishable commodities. Where these facilities have been provided these are not being
used. The traders complain that the facilities do not have a temperature controlled
environment. There is a need for careful assessment of the type and extent of facilities
required and then arrange accordingly.



The time involved in completion of various business processes at the airports is unduly
long. Pakistan Customs Computerized System (PACCS) introduced by Customs at the
container terminals needs to be extended to all airports and the IT systems of Civil
Aviation Authority (CAA), airlines, cargo handling agent and air cargo agents integrated
with it.



The exporters have complained of lack of suitable lockers with strong rooms at Karachi,
Lahore and Peshawar airports for keeping gems and jewelry and other valuables. There
are also complaints of excessive charges by PIA for carriage of such items.



CAA does not levy any throughput charges for the exports. It levies throughput charges
at the rate of 2% of International Air Transport Association (IATA) tariff for the air freight
on the normal imports and 5% of IATA tariff on imports requiring immediate clearance.
Actual freight paid on these consignments is usually much less than the IATA tariff and
there are complaints from the air cargo agents on behalf of the importers that the
charges levied by CAA are excessive.



Because of the geographical location of Pakistan there is great opportunity for exploiting
sea-air multi-modal transport to Central Asian Republics (CAR). But this requires
streamlining of related systems and procedures for quick transfer of cargo from sea
ports to airport and promotion of regular air services to CAR.



In light of the survey of the above mentioned airports and discussions with the
stakeholders the following are recommended:



Recommendations



General

1. PACCS may be introduced by Pakistan Customs at all airports and IT systems of
CAA, airlines, air cargo agents and cargo handling agents may be integrated with
it to function as a Single Window.



2. Aircraft landing charges and fuel prices charged at Pakistani airports may be
compared with the regional airports and rationalized to make them comparable
with the charges at the regional airports.




3. CAA may establish suitable adjudication mechanism at each airport for quick
resolution of disputes relating to throughput charges.



4. Modern scanners of adequate capacity for the cargo load may be installed at all
airports for screening of cargo.



5. All stakeholders should be consulted during the planning stages of new airports
at Islamabad and Gwadar and new terminal facilities at other ports to ensure that
the cargo handling facilities are adequate and in keeping with the latest cargo
handling practices and regulatory requirements.



6. PIA may introduce appropriate security arrangements in its aircraft for transport
of gems and jewelry at a reasonable cost.



7. The procedures of all organizations involved in transport supply chain may be
streamlined to facilitate development of sea-air-road multi-modal transport
logistics.



Karachi Airport

8. To eliminate damage and pilferage of cargo the backyard area of airlines
warehouses in CAA Cargo Complex Air Freight Unit (AFU) may be covered with
sheds and caged. The sheds in examination area of AFU also need to be
extended on both sides to cover the open area between the shed and the airline
warehouses and the open space for receiving the cargo. Security against
pilferage may be strengthened. A modern scanner of adequate capacity may be
installed.



9. PIA Cargo Complex may be expanded to integrate all export, import and
domestic cargo operations at one place. Necessary funding arrangement for
early execution of this expansion may be made. There should be suitable
provision for temperature controlled cool rooms for perishable commodities,
chiller room for medicines, strong room with lockers for valuables, modern
scanners and closed circuit TV monitoring.



10. The scattered cargo handling facilities at Karachi Airport may be integrated by
developing a Cargo Village with modern warehousing and cold storage, and all
other modern equipment required in such a facility. Necessary offices, other
amenities and parking spaces may also be provided.



Lahore Airport

11. Construction of a permanent Customs block at the Cargo Complex of Allama
Iqbal International Airport may be taken in hand immediately. In the meanwhile
suitable offices may be made available for the Customs staff to carry out their
functions in a comfortable environment.



12. Suitable cold rooms for perishable commodities, chillers for medicines, strong
rooms with lockers, scanners, and close circuit TV surveillance may be provided
in the warehouses of all cargo handling agents including PIA. Separate space
may be allocated for hazardous cargo.



13. Banking facilities, offices for air cargo agents, rest rooms for drivers, parking area
for container trailers and other necessary amenities may be provided.



Islamabad Airport


14. PIA Cargo Terminal may be expanded by getting some more space allocated for
it from the airport apron area, and the layout of the terminal improved on
scientific lines to enable proper segregation, sorting, examination and flow of
cargo. Weighbridge and modern scanner of adequate capacity may be provided.
Close circuit TV surveillance may be introduced. Separate provision may be
made for handling livestock and hazardous cargo.



15. At the new Islamabad Airport a modern cargo complex may be built along with
the airport terminal during the initial stages of building the airport. All
stakeholders may be consulted during the planning stage.



Peshawar Airport

16. To meet immediate requirement of smoothly handling PIA cargo suitable
arrangements on mutually acceptable terms may be worked out between PIA
and Shaheen Airport Services (SAPS) to make use of the spare capacity in
SAPS premises for handling export cargo of PIA.



17. Arrangements may be worked out by the Ministry of Defence in coordination with
CAA, Airport Security Force (ASF), Army and Air Force to expand the Peshawar
Airport Terminal as proposed by CAA Works Section, Peshawar Airport and all
modern facilities may be provided in the expanded cargo terminal.



Sialkot Airport

18. Sialkot International Airport (Pvt.) Limited (SIAL) may be provided all the facilities
for efficient operation of Sialkot Airport as agreed in the Memorandum of
Understanding between SIAL and the Government of Pakistan.



Multan Airport

19. Runway may be extended and new cargo terminal built as already approved by
the Government.



20. Modern scanner, weighbridge, Closed Circuit TV and other modern facilities may
be provided in the new cargo terminal.



Faisalabad Airport

21. Cargo shed may be shifted close to the apron, if practicable.



Quetta Airport

22. Installation of larger capacity modern scanner and weighbridge may be
considered on the basis of operational requirements.



Gwadar Airport

23. At Gwadar basic issues relate to development of infrastructure for attracting
industrial and commercial activities. The important actions that need to be taken
are:



(i) Curb escalation of land prices by restricting transfer of property and
making it incumbent on the allottees to establish within a specified period
the enterprise for which the land has been allotted.



(ii) Establish a polytechnic institute for training of craftsmen like electricians,
masons, plumbers, carpenters, mechanics etc. so that the development
activities can take place.




(iii) Make the industrial area a Free Trade Zone exempted from levy of
Customs duty and other taxes like Jabal Ali in Dubai to attract investment.



24. New Airport may be built to commence operation when the industry starts to take
off and a modern cargo complex may be built along with the airport.


1. Introduction

1.1 The 5th meeting on National Trade Corridor Improvement Programme (NTCIP)
was held on 25th March, 2006 in Islamabad under the chairmanship of the Prime
Minister. The Prime Minister asked all relevant agencies to move promptly on re-
designing of procedures and processes, strengthening of infrastructure i.e. roads,
railways, airports and ports to improve the logistics chain with a view to reducing the cost
of doing business, facilitating trade and investment in Pakistan, and increasing
competitiveness of Pakistani products in global markets. With regard to improvement in
cargo handling facilities, the Prime Minister was pleased to direct Ministry of Commerce
to prepare a strategy to forecast growth of air cargo so that infrastructure development
could keep pace with such growth, and with the specific requirements of different
regions.



1.2 In order to discuss projections about the future requirements of air cargo facilities
at airports, a meeting of key stakeholders was held in Islamabad under the chairmanship
of Secretary Commerce on 29th April, 2006. List of participant of the meeting is at
Annex-I. After having thorough deliberation on relevant issues, the meeting decided that
a detailed study may be carried out by hiring a Consultant for a four weeks period. The
meeting discussed and finalized the Terms of Reference (ToR) of the study (Annex-II).
Secretary Commerce asked the participants to provide all relevant information to the
Consultancy Firm, when the firm approaches them for the purpose.



1.3 Ministry of Commerce invited applications from consultants by advertisement
through press, for conducting this study. As adequate response was not received from
private sector for carrying out this study, the Ministry of Commerce decided to utilize the
expertise of its own staff. The following officers volunteered to carryout this assignment
in addition to their own duties, free of cost:-



1. Syed Irtiqa Ahmed Zaidi, National Consultant (UNDP-TIHP) Ministry of
Commerce, Islamabad.

2. Mr. Javaid Mansoor, Executive Secretary, National Trade & Transport
Facilitation Committee (NTTFC), Ministry of Commerce, Karachi.

1.4 All 9 international airports mentioned in the report were visited by the team
comprising above officers and the issues discussed with the stakeholder. As the
recommendations emerging from the report mainly concerned CAA, PIA and ACAAP the
Draft Report was forwarded to them for comments and discussed with the concerned
officials. The additional information provided by the stakeholders has been incorporated
in the Report.




2. International Trade of Pakistan

2.1 Since 2001-02 the exports of Pakistan have been growing consistently at an average
annual rate of 15.9%. During the same period the imports have increased at even faster
rate of 28.9%. This has resulted in the trade deficit increasing to US$11.712 billion
during 2005-06. To overcome this situation the government has adopted a trade policy
to encourage growth in exports and curtail increase in imports.



Table 2.1: Exports and Imports of Pakistan

5101520253035
2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06Billion
US
$
ExportsImports


 (Billion US $)
Year 2000-01 2001-02 2002-032003-042004-052005-06Exports9.2029.13511.16012.31314.39116.469Imports10.72910.34012.22015.59220.59828.581

Source: State Bank of Pakistan



2.2 Sea offers the cheapest mode of transport. For the countries not connected by land
the only alternative is transport by air, which is relatively very expensive. Over 95% trade
of Pakistan is carried by sea.



Table 2.2: Trade of Pakistan through Sea

(Million tonnes)
Ports2000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05Karachi Port
- Imports20.06320.33019.63621.73222.100
- Exports5.9186.3626.2736.0816.515Total (Imports & Exports)25.98126.69225.90927.81328.615Port Qasim
- Imports11.97711.08212.25511.74516.506
- Exports2.1962.8703.8913.8924.773Total (Imports & Exports)14.17313.95216.14615.63721.279Total Trade by Sea
- Imports32.04031.41231.89133.47738.606
- Exports8.1149.23210.1649.97311.288Total (Imports & Exports)40.15440.64442.05543.45049.894

Source: KPT and PQA




Table 2.3: Exports from Pakistan

Figures in 'Million DollarsS. No.Commodities2000-20012001-20022002-20032003-20042004-2005
ATextile & Garments6,1155,9977,4588,2528,9261Raw cotton1392549481102Yarn1,1459819761,1621,0873Fabrics1,1041,2031,4051,7662,0504Garments1,7381,7212,2392,4522,7235Madeups (incl. Bedwear)1,0761,2691,6891,8001,9166Towels2422683754045207Tents & Canvas49507375678Art Silk & Synthetic Textile5454105744713009Other textiles77717775
BOther core categories2,1292,0802,2522,4113,1901Rice5264485556349332Leather & leather products(incl. footwear)6936726957449383Sports goods2713043353253074Wool & wool products290251223234280
ICarpets & rugs tapestry289250221231278
IIRaw wool & animal hairs112225Surgical instruments1241451501331836Petroleum & petroleum products1841912492944767Molasses416945477
CDevelopment / Categoris5716168528321,0981Fish & fish preparations1381261341531392Fruits & Vegetables104106115134126
IFruits79838310391
IIVegetables
(excl. dried leguminous)2219262621
IIIFruit & Vegetable Juices3456143Wheat (un-milled)117113064Chemical & Pharmaceuticals
(including Urea)1641532612634535Engineering Group8390133177274
IEngineering Goods445174100182
IIMetal manufacturing
(incl. house equipmenst)1314294758
IIICutlery26253030346Marble & Granite /
ONYX Manufacture19161818157Gems Jewellery2628252828IT Services19202133469Poultry / Eggs Albumen etc.2355310Meat & meat preparation54111518
DAll others3864425988181,1781Guar & guar products21162420262Cement131127613Sugar172514Oil, seed, nuts & kernals1221711225Animal casings / guts /
stomach / bladder etc109101416Handicrafts NS16202715127Others3263715127051,025
TOTAL9,2029,13511,16012,31314,391

Source: Export Promotion Bureau








2.3 Trade with Afghanistan and some trade with China, Iran and India is carried out by
land routes, but the statistics for the volume of this trade are not readily available.



2.4 Air is the most expensive mode of transport and is used mainly for transport of gems,
jewellery and other expensive articles to avoid blockage of capital over prolonged period,
perishable commodities to avoid damage to cargo, and items with tight delivery
schedules to meet the required delivery dates. The volume of trade by air during 2004-05
amounted to a little over 0.4% of the total trade measured by weight. The share in imports
was less than 0.2%. But the share in exports was about 1.3%. Exact figures for the value
of exports by air could not be obtained. However, on the basis of limited information, the
share of exports by air in terms of value is estimated at over 8 % of the total export value.



Table 2.4: Total Trade of Pakistan by Air

 (Tonnes)
Year2000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05Loaded117,810108,445121,923144,855146,494Un-loaded53,57747,57352,25755,50070,163Transit960573595613408Total172,347349,550174,775200,968217,065

Source: Civil Aviation Authority



2.5 The horticultural products, such as fruits, vegetables and flowers, are perishable
commodities that have to be delivered to destination within a limited period and in
controlled environment to ensure delivery in good condition without any damage. The
floriculture has not yet advanced sufficiently for export to international market. The fruits
and vegetables are being exported in substantial volumes. Besides the major
commodities indicated in Table 2.5, Pakistan exported during 2004-05 about 66,000
tonnes of other fresh fruits and about 30,000 tonnes of various fresh vegetables



Table 2.5: Major Fruit and Vegetable Exports from Pakistan

(Tonnes)
Commodity 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05Kinnows97,028121,69294,806149,58774,507Mangoes53,44447,54158,84477,46848,811Dates (fresh)6,6224,6543,3532,6454,108Dates (dried)73,33472,87967,79162,78479,946Apples1,47581825097100Potatoes58,45056,98757,66356,04220,762Onions77,16853,37858,63649,07829,597Total367,521357,949341,343397,701257,831

Source: Federal Bureau of Statistics through PHDEB






3. Transport of Cargo by Air

3.1 At present there are 42 civil airports in Pakistan. A few of these are non-
operational and some have very limited local passenger services. Many of these are
also joint facilities for the civil as well as air force operations. The following are
designated as the international airports:



Karachi

Lahore

Islamabad

Peshawar

Faisalabad

Multan

Quetta

Gwadar

Turbat

Pasni



3.2 Very limited services are operated from Turbat and Pasni. No international cargo
is transported from these airports and the domestic cargo is negligible. Therefore
these airports were not covered by this study. An international airport in the private
sector is being developed by Sialkot Chamber of Commerce and Industry. This
facility was also surveyed during the study.



3.3 The total cargo transported from all the international airports of Pakistan is
indicated in Table 3.1.



Table 3.1: Total Cargo Handled at All Airports in Pakistan

 (Tonnes)
Year2000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalLoaded117,810 108,445 121,923 144,855 146,494
Transit960 573 595 613 408
Total172,347 156,591 174,775 200,968 217,065
DomesticLoaded39,922 40,608 47,017 48,991 56,337
Un-loaded39,922 40,608 47,017 48,991 56,337
Total79,844 81,216 94,034 97,982 112,674
Int'l + Domestic(incl. Transit)
Loaded157,732 149,053 168,940 193,846 202,831
Un-loaded93,499 88,181 99,274 104,491 126,500
Total252,191 237,807 268,809 298,950 329,739
-
50,000100,000150,000200,000250,000300,000350,0002000-
012001-
022002-
032003-
042004-
05InternationalDomesticInt'l +
domestic(incl. Transit)


Source: Civil Aviation Authority



3.4 The wide bodied passenger aircrafts have spare capacity in the hold for carriage
of cargo. These aircraft are, therefore, operated in passenger-cum-cargo mode and
are the main carriers of cargo on scheduled services. To meet additional demand a
few carriers like Lufthansa have introduced cargo services. Some other operators
have also introduced chartered flights to meet seasonal demands for transport of
cargo.



3.5 There are complaints from exporters and air cargo agents that many international
airlines have withdrawn from calling Pakistani airports because of high landing
charges of CAA for aircrafts and high fuel price in Pakistan, thereby reducing the
availability of cargo space for transport of international cargo by air. However, no
statistics were available to determine the cargo that could not be air freighted
because of non-availability of cargo space. An evaluation of the landing charges and
fuel prices payable in the airports of regional countries needs to be carried out and
suitable measures adopted to attract foreign airlines to call at Pakistani airports.



3.6 Karachi, Lahore, Islamabad and Peshawar are the main airports for transport of
cargo, both domestic and international. The major airlines and operators that have
been operating from these airports and the cargo lifted by them is indicated in Table
3.2.








Table 3.2: Cargo Transported by Major Airlines / Operators during 2004-05

(Tonnes)
Airline / Operator Karachi Islamabad Lahore PeshawarAERO ASIA 6,6272,1283,396474AIR BLUE-1,448-653AIR SOFIA (DHL)--5,274-
BRITISH AIRWAYS-2,949--
CARGOLUX AIRLINES4,630---
CATHAY PACIFIC AIRWAYS4,748---
EMIRATES AIRLINES21,1065,0407,6021,220GULF AIR4,0582,9333,5231,110KUWAIT AIRWAYS-1,018--
LUFTHANSA --5,753-
PIA85,24027,50039,5904,762QATAR AIRWAYS-1,2072,0181,601ROYAL AIRLINE9,582-7,327-
SAUDI ARABIAN AIRLINES7,4142,4543,0571,566SHAHEEN AIRLINE -611-290SWISS AIR8,677---
THAI AIRWAYS .4,952-4,522-

Source: Civil Aviation Authority



3.7 The other important factor affecting the transport of cargo by air is the availability
of cargo handling facilities at the airports. At all the airports there are constraints of
space for handling the cargo. PIA and Aero Asia handle their own cargo, while Air
Blue and foreign airlines make use of the services of the cargo handling agents like
SAPS and Gerry’s Dnata. Because of lack of integration of operations the available
facilities are not efficiently utilized. All airports require modern cargo handling
facilities extending over much larger area.



3.8 Security has become an important issue for international transport of cargo,
especially by air. Unless the cargo is screened through a modern screening machine
capable of detecting explosives the cargo has to be held back at the airport for 24
hours cooling period. This defeats the very objective of quick delivery through air
shipment. Many of the cargo handling facilities at the airports lack suitable screening
machines. Physical examination of cargo damages packaging, and also makes the
cargo susceptible to pilferage affecting its acceptability by the importer.



3.9 Fruits and vegetables are an important export commodity of Pakistan. Because of
their perishable nature a substantial quantity of fruits and vegetables meant for
distant destinations is transported by air. The Table 3.3 shows the estimated quantity
exported by air.



Table 3.3: Estimated Exports of Fruits and Vegetables by Air during 2004-05

(Tonnes)
CommodityKarachiLahoreIslamabadMultanPeshawarQuettaMango20,0008,5002,5001,0002,0000Dates fresh3,50000000Other fresh fruits10,0003,0001,0000250NegligibleFresh vegetables10,0003,0001,00004,000NegligibleTotal43,50014,5004,5001,0006,250Negligible

Source: Market sources through PHDEB



3.10 To maintain fruits and vegetables in good condition these must not be exposed
to hot weather for prolonged period and stored in cool and dry environment,


preferably in a cold room cooled to the required temperature. The fruits and
vegetables exporters complain that the airports do not have satisfactory cold storage
arrangements and export consignments get damaged, especially when these are
held back because of lack of space in the aircraft or missing a flight. The
representatives of CAA and ACAAP have stated that where such facilities have been
provided those are not being utilized. Therefore provision of such facilities needs to
be decided after careful evaluation of actual requirements.



3.11 Lack of suitable lockers and strong rooms meeting the international aviation
standards is an issue of particular concern to the gem and jewelry exporters. They
also complain of lack of secure arrangements for carriage of such valuables in PIA
aircraft, high freight charges and the necessity of carrying the items in person or on
payment of air fare for the escort. Secure arrangements for transport of gems and
jewelry, export of which is being promoted by the Government of Pakistan, need to
be developed.



3.12 CAA does not levy any throughput charges for the exports. It levies throughput
charges at the rate of 2% of IATA tariff for the air freight on the normal imports and
5% of IATA tariff on imports requiring immediate clearance. Actual freight paid on
these consignments is usually much less than the IATA tariff and there are
complaints from the air cargo agents on behalf of the importers that the charges
levied by CAA are excessive. An adjudication mechanism needs to be put in place at
each airport to quickly resolve these disputes.



3.13 Sialkot International Airport being developed by the private sector is expected to
commence cargo operations by end 2006 or beginning of 2007. Sialkot Chamber of
Commerce and Industry (SCCI) claims that at present over 40 tonnes per day of
commodities manufactured in Sialkot are being exported by air through various
airports of Pakistan. After the Sialkot airport comes in operation they will be able to
quadruple these exports within the projected 10 years. The success of Sialkot
international Airport will depend very much on the ability of Sialkot Airport
management to attract adequate cargo and passenger flights to various export
destinations.



Figure 3.1: Projected Transport of Cargo by Air-
200,000400,000600,000800,0001,000,0001,200,0001,400,0002000-
012001-
022002-
032003-
042004-
052005-
062006-
072007-
082008-
092009-
102010-
112011-
122012-
132013-
142014-
152015-
162016-
172017-
182018-
192019-
20YearsTonnesInternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic




3.14 On the basis of projected growth of cargo traffic at various airports and new
traffic that would be generated by increased exports from Sialkot airport it has been
estimated that the domestic air cargo and imports of air cargo will grow annually at
average rate of 8.5%, while the exports by air will grow at the rate of 10%. With this


projected growth the total air cargo will increase from about 330,000 tonnes in 2004-
05 to about 866,000 tonnes in 2015-16. Cargo handling facilities have therefore to be
created to meet this volume of air cargo.



3.15 The above projections have not taken in consideration the sea-air multi-modal
transport of cargo to Central Asian Republics using the ports in Pakistan as the
interchange point. Pakistani ports could serve as a convenient interchange point
provided an efficient logistics supply chain is developed, whereby the urgent delivery
cargo arriving by sea or air could be transferred to the other mode of transport within
hours with the minimum essential processing formalities. This would also require
frequent air services to various destinations in CAR. At present Dubai is serving as a
hub for such multi-modal transport, where transfer from sea to air takes place within
hours.



3.16 An integrated computerized business process system is an essential
requirement for efficient handling of air cargo. At present different agencies involved
in the process i.e. Customs, CAA, airlines and cargo handling operators have their
own IT systems without being interlinked to each other. PACCS introduced by
Pakistan Customs under Customs Administrative Reforms (CARE) program has not
yet been extended to the airports. For the system to work efficiently as a Single
Window it is essential that the PACCS should be introduced at all international
airports and IT systems of all agencies involved in air movement of cargo should be
integrated with PACCS.






4. Jinnah International Airport, Karachi

4.1 Most of the international as well as domestic cargo transported by air is handled
at Karachi. During 2004-05 Karachi airport handled 179,856 tonnes of cargo
including 126,682 tonnes of international cargo. The cargo transported through
Karachi airport has shown a continuous growth since 2001-02 at an average growth
rate of 7.2%, although the cargo loaded for export during 2004-05 was a little less
than 2003-04.



Table 4.1: Cargo handled at Jinnah International Airport, Karachi

 (Metric Tons)
Year2000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalLoaded77,110 68,547 75,988 86,873 84,249
Un-loaded31,863 27,771 30,490 32,187 42,025
Transit960 573 595 599 408
Total109,933 96,891 107,073 119,659 126,682
DomesticLoaded18,241 19,540 23,486 24,231 29,277
Un-loaded19,499 19,261 21,484 22,039 23,897
Total37,740 38,801 44,970 46,270 53,174
Int'l + Domestic(incl. Transit)
Loaded95,351 88,087 99,474 111,104 113,526
Un-loaded51,362 47,032 51,974 54,226 65,922
Total147,673 135,692 152,043 165,929 179,856
-
20,00040,00060,00080,000100,000120,000140,000160,000180,000200,0002000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic


Source: CAA



4.2 Assuming that the growth rate of last four years is maintained the cargo
throughput of Karachi airport would increase to about 400,000 tonnes by 2015-16. A
substantial part of the cargo loaded at Karachi airport for export originates from
Punjab. The actual cargo handled at the airport will depend on the growth in national
GDP, the cargo handling facilities developed at Karachi and other airports in Pakistan
especially Lahore, Islamabad, Sialkot and Multan, and availability of airline services
with adequate cargo carrying capacity for various export destinations.



Figure 4.1: Projected Throughput of Cargo at Karachi International Airport

-
100,000200,000300,000400,000500,000600,0002000-
012001-
022002-
032003-
042004-
052005-
062006-
072007-
082008-
092009-
102010-
112011-
122012-
132013-
142014-
152015-
162016-
172017-
182018-
192019-
20YearsTonnesInternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic




4.3 The projections shown in the graph above do not include the transit trade by air
to CAR for which much scope exists. Under the modern multi-modal transport
concept it is common to combine sea and air transport to achieve quick delivery at
reduced cost. Because of the land routes through Afghanistan to CAR being blocked,
Karachi is located in an ideal position for the cargo to CAR to be brought to Karachi
by sea and then transited to final destination by air. However, such an operation
requires a very efficient operation of the logistics, with the cargo arriving by sea
moving to the airport after completion of all Customs formalities within a few hours for
onward transit to final destination by air. Development of such a logistics chain could
greatly increase the volume of cargo transported by air through Karachi.




4.4 In terms of value the major commodities exported by air through Karachi airport
are: apparel, clothing and made ups; leather garments and articles thereof; textile
and fiber, knitted and woven fabrics; carpets and other textile flooring; electrical
machinery and equipment, gems and jewelry; pharmaceutical products; fish and
crustaceans; fruits and vegetables; and fresh meat.



Table 4.2: Commodity Exports from Karachi Airport

 Figure in million rupees
Commodity20012002200320042005Live animals03.352.8512.551.271.8Meat & edible meat offal02.2126.6346.9543.4535.3Fish & crustaceans, molluscs..228.6710.91,033.11,149.71,535.1Food items30.1113.0405.3455.3477.3Fruits & vegetables364.7483.8498.9622.2803.4Pharmaceutical products131.3350.3733.71,201.41,385.2Rubber & plastic articles04.937.682.7139.1103.7Leather garments & articles thereof7,333.97,467.010,764.812,357.715,083.5Textile & fibre741.22,232.97,515.55,006.23,338.4Carpets & other textile flooring423.3444.564.1817.9946.3Kintted & woven fabrics238.244.3314.76,327.11,975.1Apparel, clothing & madeups7,821.29,855.514,571.211,756.616,857.3Footwear, Guaitars & parts16.744.183.6152.3200.5Stone & glassware00.418.473.036.721.9Gems & jewellery28.91,370.71,084.11,166.41,129.6Metal articles18.927.438.241.072.2Electrical machinery & equipments12.584.6373.0959.62,003.8Mechanical machinery & equipments04.851.388.7181.8177.7Optical, photographic…07.532.153.3106.9154.2Arms, ammunitions & accessories00.038.8119.448.910.4Furniture, bedding, mattress157.154.912.613.315.2Toys, games & sports goods09.121.258.8220.1179.2Miscellaneous items36.247.9131.3180.5365.6
TOTAL17,615.023,710.638,959.343,535.447,442.8

Source: Compiled by study team from PRAL data



4.5 Maximum numbers of airlines on international routes from Pakistan operate from
Karachi. The cargo is mainly transported in a combined operation on wide bodied
aircraft passenger flights, which have spare cargo carrying capacity. A few foreign
airlines like Lufthansa and Emirates have also operated exclusive cargo flights.
Occasionally aircraft are also chartered by some operators for cargo operations only.



4.6 The statistics of cargo transported by various airlines show that nearly half of the
cargo transported by air from Karachi airport is lifted by PIA. Other airlines lifting
substantial volume of cargo are: Emirates Airline, Royal Airline, Saudi Arabian
Airline, Lufthansa Airline, Swiss Airline, Aero Asia, Thai Airways, Cathy Pacific
Airline, and Cargolux Airlines. Recently Air Blue and Etihad Airways have also
started to lift reasonable volume of cargo.



4.7 PIA handles its own cargo, while most of the foreign airlines make use of the
services of SAPS or Gerry’s Dnata. At present SAPS is handling the cargo of
Malaysian Airlines, Royal Airline, Singapore Airline, Cargolux Airline, Etihad Airline,
Iran Air and Lufthansa Airlines. Gerry’s Dnata is handling Emirate Airlines, Turkish
Airlines, Air Lanka, Express Service and Air Blue.



4.8 The cargo handling facilities are scattered at different locations over various
terminals and the cargo complex constructed by the Civil Aviation Authority in 2003.
Imports by PIA are handled at Terminal 1. Imports by foreign carriers are handled by
SAPS and Gerry’s Dnata at the Terminal 2 Air Freight Unit. The imports requiring
immediate clearance like blood plasma, medicines, perishables, precious metals,
courier services etc. are handled at Terminal 3. The cargo complex handles the
cargo exported through foreign airlines. PIA has its own facility for export cargo next
to the cargo complex. The domestic cargo is handled by PIA at yet another place


next to Terminal 1. DHL and TCS are developing their own handling area for the
express services at another place on the road leading to the cargo complex. There is
no proper arrangement for separate storage of dangerous goods. The facilities
scattered over different areas create considerable difficulties for the cargo clearing
service providers as adequate basic facilities like canteen and wash rooms are not
available at all places.



Table 4.3: Cargo Traffic by Airlines at Karachi Airport

(Tonnes)
Name of Airline/ Operators 2000 - 2001 2001 - 2002 2002 - 2003 2003 - 2004 2004 - 2005AERO ASIA AIRLINE 3,432 4,2755,7096,8526,627AEROFLOAT AIRLINE 679 - - - -
AIR CHINA LIMITED 699 441500547717AIR FRANCE 3,577 807 - 1,3281,618AIR SOFIA C/O (DHL) - - 752,1542,058AIR BLUE - - - 1753,829BANGLADESH BIMAN 540 7219075991,366BHOJA AIR 428 - - - -
CARGOLUX AIRLINES 2,483 5,0956,8956,1764,630CATHAY PACIFIC AIRWAYS 1,761 1,5583,3706,4264,748EGYPT AIR 716 2531,274441 -
EMIRATES AIRLINES. 12,513 16,14417,09219,20321,106ASSOCIATE 423 466715400 -
ETIHAD AIRWAYS - - - - 1,876GULF AIR 2,115 2,3383,1404,1034,058INDIAN AIRLINE CORP. 78 4 - - -
IRAN AIR. 63 1442684,652312KUWAIT AIRWAYS 371 265372230 -
LUFTHANSA CARGO AG 9,280 6,9798,128 - -
LUFTHANSA AIRLINES - - - 9,3633,754MALAYSIAN AIRLINES 1,888 1,4582,4092,6953,333OMAN AIR 7 - 204 - -
PAKISTAN INTERNL AIRLINES 81,064 72,52071,51472,20185,240QATAR AIRWAYS 1,271 1,5691,9261,3631,054ROYAL AIRLINE - 1764,2235,2829,582ROYAL JORDANIAN 661 725952883394SAUDI ARABIAN AIRLINES 8,619 7,4239,1968,4437,414SHAHEEN AIR INTERNATIONAL 884 - 1,4831,1861,141SHAHEEN AIRLINE 521 538737516414SINGAPORE AIRLINES 1,968 1,025 - - -
SRILANKAN AIRLINES 343 386797 - -
SWISS AIR 4,312 4,3804,3474,9018,677SYRIAN ARAB AIRLINES 379 285155183262THAI AIRWAYS INTERNATIONAL 4,845 3,0804,7024,8304,952TURKISH AIRLINES 231 247357290284YEMENIA, YEMEN AIRWAYS 290 - - - -
Total 146,441 133,302151,447165,422179,448

Source: Civil Aviation Authority



4.9 Present availability of space for cargo handling facilities and its adequacy for
meeting the future requirement as indicated by CAA, PIA and other cargo handling
service providers is shown in Table 4.4.



4.10 The Cargo Complex constructed recently by CAA for export cargo has a modern
office block for administration and air cargo agents’ offices. There is adequate
parking arrangement for trucks and other facilities for truck drivers. However, the
examination area, where the cargo is received, does not have adequate covered
area. The cargo lying there is exposed to sun and rain and frequently gets damaged.
There are also complaints of lack of cool hall for perishable cargo. It is stated that the
cargo handed over to the airlines is left in the open for the cooling period of 24 hours.


During this period it frequently gets damaged or pilfered. Pye-dogs damaging the
cargo were also mentioned by the exporters.



4.11 In the case of perishable commodities, missing a flight because of some reason,
their condition deteriorates because of non-availability of suitable cooling
arrangement. There are also complaints of inadequate scanning facilities, which
result in delay in processing, need for the cargo being detained for 24 hours cooling
period, and damage to packing and contents because of their physical examination.



Table 4.4: Facilities of Cargo Handling Service Providers

Item

PIA

SAPS

Gerry’s
Dnata

DHL*

CAA**

(Consolidated
for entire
airport)

Available open plinth area

23,000 ft2

3,100 ft2 for
exports

4,500 ft2

Not
applicable

Exports
245,500 ft2

Imports

18,000 ft2

Average utilization

100%peak
period

80-90%

100 %



Exp. 60%

Imp. 80%

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



Double

Not indicated

10,000 ft2

Same

30 to 40%
increase

Available covered storage
area

42,000 ft2

AFU 44,483
ft2

Exp 8,700 ft2,

 ICG 2,250 ft2

10,800 ft2

25,000 ft2

Exports

124,868 ft2

Imports

225,351 ft2

Average utilization

70%

90%

70%

Not
indicated

Exp. 70%

Imp. 90%

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



Double

Not indicated

15,500 ft2

Same

50% increase

Available cold storage area

1,536 ft2

ventilated
hall

Imp 755 ft2

Exp 115 ft2

1,940 cft

2-8o C

Fridge 900
cft.

18,530 cft

2 to 8o C and
15 to 25o C

Average utilization

6 hrs per
day

90%

95%



Exports 20%

Imports 80%

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



3.000 ft2
with chiller

Freezer van
required

3,500 cft

To be
determined

50% increase

Area for Customs
processing

8,000 ft2

1,000 ft2

3,500 ft2

2,700 ft2

Exports

4,200 ft2

Imports

6,000 ft2

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



12,000 ft2

Not indicated

6,000 ft2

Same

Same

Facilities like vehicle
parking, drivers rest area,
office spaces etc.



30,000 ft2

Offices

AFU 1,453 ft2

Exp 3,210 ft2

Adequate

35.000 ft2

Not indicate

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years

50,000 ft2

Not indicated

10,000 ft2

Same

Not indicated

* DHL is developing its own facilities, which are expected to be ready by 2007

** Figures include all spaces operated by cargo service providers as well as CAA

Sources: PIA, SAPS, Gerry’s Dnata, DHL and CAA



4.12 A sketch showing the layout of the CAA cargo sheds for exports in the cargo
complex is produced on the next page. To reduce pilferage and provide security
closed circuit TV cameras need to be installed in the entire area. Modern scanning
machines of adequate capacity are also required to minimize manual examination
and holding back the cargo for 24 hours cooling period.







4.13 To reduce the complaints of pilferage CAA intends to arrange for the covered
shed and grills (indicated in the sketch as backyard grills) to be erected behind the
warehouses allocated to various airlines. The shed in examination area also needs to
be extended in width to reduce the complaints of lack of covered area. However, this
can be considered only as a temporary arrangement to meet the present
requirements and will not be adequate for handling the projected growth in cargo
traffic.



4.14 For efficiently handling the growing traffic projected for the next ten years there
is an urgent need to develop an integrated cargo handling facility in the form of a
cargo village in which all the international, domestic and transit cargo may be
handled efficiently under a single window operating system. This cargo village should
have adequate modern warehouses; cold storages; offices and amenities for
Customs, airlines, banks, cargo handlers, freight forwarders, air cargo agents,
transporters, and other service providers; and parking area for trailers, trucks, cars
and other vehicles. Necessary space is available at present between Jinnah Avenue
and the airport boundary from Terminal 1 to the road leading to Jinnah International
Airport. CAA has a plan for development of the cargo village in private sector. This
needs to be expedited.



4.15 To overcome the difficulties experienced by PIA, because of its cargo
operations being scattered at different locations, it has already prepared a plan for
integrating all its cargo operations at one location. Sketch showing the proposed plan
of PIA is produced below. Execution of the plan has already been delayed for over a
decade. It is feared that because of the financial constraints execution of the plan
might be delayed. Necessary funds need to be allocated to ensure that the proposed
plan gets executed at the earliest.



4.16 However, increasing the capacity of physical infrastructure only will not be
sufficient for increasing the throughput of cargo moving through the airport. To match
it there has to be adequate cargo carrying capacity on the aircrafts of the airlines
calling at the airport. Suitable measures will have to be introduced to attract more
foreign airlines to call at Karachi.






PIA’s Proposed Plan for Expansion of Existing Cargo Complex





5. Allama Iqbal International Airport, Lahore

5.1 The next airport in terms of the volume of cargo handled by air is the Lahore
airport. During 2004-05 it handled 85,552 tonnes of total cargo, of which 52,728
tonnes was the international cargo. The exports amounted to 36,942 tonnes. Since
2001-02 the cargo handled at Lahore airport has shown a steady growth at the
average annual rate of about 11 %. The international cargo has grown at the rate of
about 10%, while the domestic cargo has increased at the rate of about 12%.



Table 5.1: Cargo handled at Lahore International Airport

 (Tonnes)
Year2000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalLoaded26,595 25,323 27,439 36,595 36,946
Un-loaded12,690 10,568 11,955 12,094 15,782
Transit- - - 14 -
Total39,285 35,891 39,394 48,703 52,728
DomesticLoaded11,804 11,117 14,069 14,736 16,196
Un-loaded8,557 9,562 10,825 12,902 16,628
Total20,361 20,679 24,894 27,638 32,824
Int'l + Domestic(incl. Transit)
Loaded38,399 36,440 41,508 51,331 53,142
Un-loaded21,247 20,130 22,780 24,996 32,410
Total59,646 56,570 64,288 76,341 85,552
-
10,00020,00030,00040,00050,00060,00070,00080,00090,0002000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic


Source: CAA



5.2 Assuming that the growth rate of last four years is maintained the cargo
throughput of Lahore airport would increase from 85,544 tonnes in 2004-05 to about
268,000 tonnes by 2015-16. With commissioning of Sialkot International Airport the
air cargo originating from Sialkot will no longer move from Lahore. However, area
around Lahore is developing as an industrial hub and is also surrounded by fertile
agricultural land. It is expected that the growth of various industries, especially ready
made garments industry, and horticultural produce will adequately compensate it.
Availability of airline services with adequate cargo carrying capacity for various
export destinations would be a pre-requisite.



Figure 5.1: Projected Throughput of Cargo at Lahore International Airport

-
50,000100,000150,000200,000250,000300,000350,000400,000450,0002000-
012001-
022002-
032003-
042004-
052005-
062006-
072007-
082008-
092009-
102010-
112011-
122012-
132013-
142014-
152015-
162016-
172017-
182018-
192019-
20YearsTonnesInternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic




5.3 The statistics for previous years providing the breakdown of commodities
transported through Lahore airport were not readily available. However a limited
data of the cargo moved through newly commissioned Allama Iqbal International
Airport Lahore in less than 3 months was obtained through Pakistan Revenue
Automation Limited (PRAL). It showed that In terms of value the major commodities
exported by air through Lahore airport during this period were: apparel, clothing and
made ups; leather garments and articles thereof; carpets and other textile flooring;


electrical machinery and equipment; mechanical machinery and equipment; rubber
and plastic materials; and fresh meat.



Table 5.2: Partial Export Data Allama Iqbal International Airport Lahore

Figures in million Rupees
CommodityApril, May, June 2006Live animals01.3Meat & edible meat offal123.4Fish & crustaceans, molluscs..00.5Food items04.3Fruits & vegetables24.7Pharmaceutical products55.0Rubber & plastic articles764.7Leather garments & articles thereof1,273.6Textile & fibre71.7Carpets & other textile flooring1,089.1Kintted & woven fabrics87.4Apparel, clothing & madeups1,914.6Footwear, Guaitars & parts69.3Stone & glassware03.8Gems & jewellery10.7Metal articles23.2Electrical machinery & equipments1,027.4Mechanical machinery & equipments1,054.1Optical, photographic…265.7Arms, ammunitions & accessories00.2Furniture, bedding, mattress03.7Toys, games & sports goods94.8Miscellaneous items472.7
TOTAL8,435.9

Source: Compiled by study team from PRAL data



5.4 Next to Karachi, Lahore is the busiest airport. All types of aircrafts are able to
land here. PIA, Aero Asia, Shaheen and Air Blue are the domestic airlines lifting
cargo on passenger flights in a combined passenger cum cargo operation. Emirates,
Gulf Air, Kuwait Airways, Lufthansa, Qatar Airways, Saudi Arabian Airline, Royal
Airline, and Thai Airways are the foreign airlines that have been lifting cargo regularly
from Lahore airport.



5.5 The cargo handling agents and the airlines served by them are indicated in Table
5.3.



Table 5.3: Airlines served by Service Providers at Lahore Airport

PIA

SAPS

Gerry’s Dnata

Others

PIA

Indian Airlines

Uzbekistan
Airlines

Non-scheduled
flights

Lufthansa Cargo British
World Cargo

Thai Airways

Etihad Airlines

Singapore Airlines

Qatar Airlines

Kuwait Airways

Royal Airlines

Gulf Air

Shaheen Airways

Saudi Arabian Airline

TCS (URS)

Emirates Airline

Expo. Aviation

Air Blue

DHL Aviation (Exports)

Non-scheduled flights

DHL

TCS

Aero Asia

UFS (Air Blue)


Table 5.4: Cargo Traffic by Airlines at Lahore International Airport

(Tonnes)
Name of Airline/ Operators 2000 - 2001 2001 - 2002 2002 - 2003 2003 - 2004 2004 - 2005AERO ASIA AIRLINE 1,602 2,130 2,691 3,236 3,396
AIR BLUE - - - 90 1,482
AIR SOFIA C/O (DHL) - - - 5,091 5,274
BHOJA AIR 298 - - - -
EMIRATES AIRLINES. 2,408 4,274 3,781 4,045 7,602
GULF AIR 1,413 2,440 3,369 3,618 3,523
INDIAN AIRLINE - - - 33 157
KUWAIT AIRWAYS 483 388 313 886 910
LUFTHANSA CARGO AG 9,089 4,717 8,483 - -
LUFTHANSA AIRLINES - - - 9,999 5,753
PAKISTAN INTERNL AIRLINES 32,114 31,774 34,561 34,979 39,590
QATAR AIRWAYS 731 1,500 911 1,463 2,018
ROYAL AIRLINE - 115 1,985 4,915 7,327
SAUDI ARABIAN AIRLINES 4,043 3,572 3,149 3,109 3,057
SHAHEEN AIR INTERNATIONAL 210 775 330 308 531
SHAHEEN AIRLINE, KHI 260 277 238 411 408
SINGAPORE AIRLINES LTD. 2,843 1,478 - - -
THAI AIRWAYS INTERNATIONAL 4,149 3,129 4,478 4,144 4,522
Total 59,643 56,569 64,289 76,327 85,550

Source: CAA



5.6 The newly constructed Allama Iqbal International Airport passenger terminal
started operation in March 2005. However no provision was made for construction of
a cargo terminal and the cargo is being handled through a temporary facility. This
temporary facility lacks in many respects and there are complaints from exporters, air
cargo agents, and Customs officials regarding the difficulties in working through
these temporary facilities. The premises provided to the Customs officials are
hazardous and most uncomfortable. A fire has already taken place there and records
burnt.



5.7 Realizing this situation CAA has started work on construction of a cargo complex.
The cargo warehouse of Gerry’s Dnata has been completed and is operational. The
cargo warehouses of SAPS and PIA are expected to be ready by August and
December 2006, respectively. However, the work on Customs block has not yet
commenced and could take another 2 years for completion. In the meanwhile the
Customs offices will have to be shifted to some other suitable place. Necessary
arrangements need to be made immediately.



5.8 All the warehouses being developed by PIA, SAPS and Gerry’s Dnata need to be
provided with video camera security arrangements, modern screening machines,
temperature controlled cold rooms and strong rooms with lockers. Size of the new
warehouses appears to be adequate to meet the anticipated requirements of next 10
years. However the available free land needs to be reserved for the future expansion
requirements. Banking facilities, offices for air cargo agents, rest rooms for drivers,
parking area for container trailers and other necessary amenities need to be
provided.



5.9 The information provided by the cargo handling service providers is given in
Table 5.5. However, it is to be noted that PIA and Gerry’s Dnata have provided
information regarding their existing operational facilities, while SAPS has provided
information in respect of the new facility which is expected to become operational by
end August 2006. The area allocated to various cargo handling service providers is
shown in the sketch of the Cargo Complex produced on the next page.










Table 5.5: Facilities of Cargo Handling Service Providers

Item

PIA

(Existing facility)

SAPS

(New warehouse)

Gerry’s Dnata

(Newly operational
warehouse)

Available open plinth area

Exports 6,500 ft2

Imports 10,200 ft2



21,5280 ft2

3,000 ft2

Average utilization

100%



70%

60 %

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



300% increase

Nil

6,000 ft2

Available covered storage
area

Exports 6,500 ft2

Imports 10,200 ft2



82,344 ft2



Exports 15,000 ft2

Imports 15,000 ft2

Average utilization

100%



70%

80%

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



300% increase

Not indicated

22,500 ft2

Available cold storage area

81 ft2

160 C



967 ft2

2 – 80 C

150 ft2

2-8o C

Average utilization

100%



70%

10%

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



2,500 ft2

Nil

150 ft2



Area for Customs
processing



1,500 ft2

9,687 ft2

640 ft2

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



13,500 ft2

Nil

1,000 ft2

Facilities like vehicle
parking, drivers rest area,
office spaces etc.



Open area

13,993 ft2

Adequate

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



22,000 ft2

Nil



Source: PIA, SAPS and Gerry’s Dnata






6. Islamabad International Airport

6.1 The third airport handling large volume of cargo transported by air is the
Islamabad airport. 47,583 tonnes of total cargo was handled during 2004-05. This
included 28,508 tonnes of international cargo. The volume of cargo handled has
shown continuous growth since 2000-01 at an average annual rate of 7.7%. The
international cargo has grown at the rate of 8.4% and the domestic cargo at the rate
of 6.8%.



Table 6.1: Cargo handled at Islamabad International Airport

 (Tonnes)
Year2000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalLoaded12,000 12,465 13,908 16,061 19,011
Un-loaded7,080 7,136 7,824 8,643 9,497
Transit- - - - -
Total19,080 19,601 21,732 24,704 28,508
DomesticLoaded6,587 6,984 6,653 7,102 7,401
Un-loaded7,158 7,218 9,880 9,560 11,674
Total13,745 14,202 16,533 16,662 19,075
Int'l + Domestic(incl. Transit)
Loaded18,587 19,449 20,561 23,163 26,412
Un-loaded14,238 14,354 17,704 18,203 21,171
Total32,825 33,803 38,265 41,366 47,583
Source: Civil Aviation Authority-
5,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,00035,00040,00045,00050,0002000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic




6.2 Assuming that the growth rate of last five years is maintained the cargo
throughput of Islamabad Airport would increase from 47,583 tonnes in 2004-05 to
about 110,000 tonnes by 2015-16. The projected air cargo traffic for Islamabad
airport is shown in figure 6.1.



Figure 6.1: Projected Throughput of Cargo at Islamabad Airport

-
20,00040,00060,00080,000100,000120,000140,000160,0002000-
012001-
022002-
032003-
042004-
052005-
062006-
072007-
082008-
092009-
102010-
112011-
122012-
132013-
142014-
152015-
162016-
172017-
182018-
192019-
20YearsTonnesInternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic




6.3 PRAL provided information of the value of commodities exported from Islamabad
airport during the last 3 years. In terms of value the major commodities exported by
air through Islamabad airport are: apparel, clothing and made ups; leather garments
and articles thereof; rubber and plastic articles; optical and photographic items;
electrical machinery and equipment; fruits and vegetables; and fresh meat. The
manufactured items exported through Islamabad airport are mainly produced in
Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala and Gujrat area.












Table 6.2: Commodity exports from Islamabad International Airport

 Figure in million rupees
Commodity200320042005Live animals13.501.716.9Meat & edible meat offal01.652.5126.1Fish & crustaceans, molluscs..00.000.906.2Food items72.133.938.6Fruits & vegetables255.6468.5434.0Pharmaceutical products03.707.809.9Rubber & plastic articles10.5242.91,562.8Leather garments & articles thereof1,446.22,194.83,585.9Textile & fibre00.301.764.3Carpets & other textile flooring51.474.279.5Kintted & woven fabrics30.426.939.6Apparel, clothing & madeups725.92,504.84,565.1Footwear, Guaitars & parts00.302.608.6Stone & glassware00.101.501.9Gems & jewellery25.329.051.2Metal articles41.864.1272.2Electrical machinery & equipments54.080.4234.1Mechanical machinery & equipments122.5208.7182.4Optical, photographic…991.21,523.21,102.0Arms, ammunitions & accessories03.200.100.3Furniture, bedding, mattress02.006.105.7Toys, games & sports goods322.5399.7558.2Miscellaneous items11.9148.6165.9
TOTAL4,185.88,074.613,111.3

Source: Compiled by study team from PRAL data



6.4 Emirates, Gulf Air, Saudi Arabian Airlines, British Airways, Kuwait Airways and
Qatar Airways are the main international airlines calling at Islamabad and lifting
cargo. Besides PIA, private sector Pakistani airlines are also operating from
Islamabad. However, more than 50% cargo is transported by PIA.



Table 6.3: Cargo Traffic by Airlines at Islamabad International Airport

(Tonnes)
Name of Airline/ Operators 2000 - 2001 2001 - 2002 2002 - 2003 2003 - 2004 2004 - 2005AERO ASIA AIRLINE 952 1,0371,9922,3822,128AFGHAN AIRFORCE - 1 - - -
AIR BLUE - - - 861,448ARIANA AFGHAN AIRLINES - - 6 10 -
BHOJA AIR 93 - - - -
BRITISH AIRWAYS 3,361 791 - 1,7702,949CHINA XINJIANG AIRLINES 1 335653126EMIRATES AIRLINES. 2,515 4,506 4,151 4,6975,040GULF AIR 632 1,4531,8962,1342,933KUWAIT AIRWAYS 146 1271735031,018PAKISTAN INTERNL AIRLINE 20,779 21,62925,39425,10327,500QATAR AIRWAYS - - - 981,207ROYAL AIRLINE 3,359 3,0142 - -
SAUDI ARABIAN AIRLINES 3,359 3,0143,0813,3772,454PAF C/O SAPS - - 34 - -
SHAHEEN AIR INTERNATIONAL 622 9031,153878611SHAHEEN AIRLINE, KHI 367 309 328 277171Total 36,186 36,817 38,266 41,368 47,585

Source: CAA




6.5 PIA, SAPS and Gerry’s Dnata are the main cargo handling service providers at
Islamabad airport. PIA handles its own cargo and also provides services to the
Chinese and Afghan airlines. SAPS serves British Airways, Qatar Airways, Saudi
Arabian Airline, Emirates Airlines, Gulf Air, Kuwait Airways, Lufthansa, Shaheen
Airlines and Air Blue. Availability of space for cargo handling facilities is very
restricted and possibility of expansion limited because of the area being bound by the
Chaklala Road leading to the airport and the airport apron. Brief statement of the
available space and the requirement for efficiently handling the cargo indicated by
the service providers is produced in Table 6.4.



Table 6.4: Facilities of Cargo Handling Service Providers

Item

PIA



SAPS



Gerry’s Dnata



Available open plinth area

75,300 ft2



Open: 14,730 ft2

Sheds: 8,576 ft2

13,740 ft2

Average utilization







100 %

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



150,000 ft2

Open: 69,000 ft2

Sheds: 51,000 ft2

Double

Available covered storage
area

Exports 6,556 ft2

Imports 6,470 ft2

Baggage 4,590 ft2

Misc. 1,250 ft2

26,249 ft2



Exports 16,460 ft2

Imports 13,740 ft2

Average utilization

100%





90%

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



500% increase

135,000 ft2

Three times

Available cold storage area

Chiller 8*8*8 ft

-100 C



395 ft2



Not available

Average utilization

100%







Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



1,500 ft2

2,000 ft2

Not indicated



Area for Customs
processing



Exclusive area not
available. Carried
out in open

4,000 ft2

1,000 ft2

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



10,000 ft2

19,500 ft2

2,000 ft2

Facilities like vehicle
parking, drivers rest area,
office spaces etc.



None available

5,000 ft2

Not indicated

Anticipated requirement for
next ten years



30,000 ft2

34,000 ft2

Double of existing

Source: PIA, SAPS and Gerry’s Dnata



6.6 SAPS and Gerry’s Dnata have adequate area to meet present requirements of
traffic handled by them. They will need more space to efficiently handle the
anticipated increased volume of traffic. However, the requirements indicated by them
need careful reassessment. Because of the restrictions imposed by the built up area
around these facilities the increased cargo handling facilities will have to be allocated
at the new Islamabad Airport.



6.7 PIA handles more than 50% of the cargo. The space available to it for handling
this cargo is not adequate. Proper segregation of different categories of cargoes
cannot be maintained. Weighbridge and modern scanning machine are lacking. The
grill and dangerous cargo rooms are cramped. Livestock is air freighted from here,


but there is no arrangement for their handling. Even the basic facilities like wash
rooms for the Customs officials and others working at the premises are lacking.
There is no parking space for the trailers bringing the containers loaded with cargo.
To enable flow of traffic during the day their movement has to be restricted to night,
and their parking on the road blocks the traffic. Security of the premises is
inadequate.



Figure 6.2: Line Plan of PIA Cargo Handling Terminal at Islamabad Airport

APRON<<
| |
| |
| |
134 ft
|
| |
< --------------------------------------------------------------------- 562 ft----------------------------------------------------------------------> | |
< 128 ft >< ------------------------------------------------------ 344 ft----------------------------------------------------------------------> | |
| |
> |
<------------ 73 ft -------------><---------- 72 ft ----------><------ 61 ft -----><-------------------- 99 ft ----------------><------ 52 ft -----><< |
Domestic | | |
Import/ Import Export Unaccompanied Afghan89
ft
| |
Export BaggageRefugees | | |
| | |
| | |
Gate Gate Examination Gate> | |
Area< |
Gate | |351 ftGate---------<76
ft
| |
OfficesCant-
een 31
ft
|217 ft
|
| | | |
|>> | |
<26 ft >< | |
Parking | | |
52
ft
| |
| | |
Gate>>>
CHAKLALA ROADWay
To
APRONGrillVerandahOfficesOperational Area






6.8 As construction of the new airport will take a few years there is an urgent need for
making some additional area of the airport available for this facility, rearranging the
layout scientifically for proper segregation and smooth flow of cargo, and providing
modern equipment like weighbridge, scanner, close circuit TV surveillance, fire
fighting equipment etc.



6.9 The new Islamabad International Airport is planned at Fateh Jung. 3,200 acres
land has been acquired. The project management consultant was appointed in
January 2006 and mobilized in February 2006. Draft Master Plan for the airport is
already in place. Completion on Phase I is planned for 2010. On completion of Phase
I the airport will have capacity for 6.5 million passengers per annum and a dedicated
cargo handling facility for initial capacity of 100,000 tonnes per annum with provision
for future expansion. Multi-modal transport access arrangements are planned
through 3 lane dual carriageway road and shuttle train service. Agreements have
been executed with a number of international carriers to operate services from the
Islamabad International Airport.



6.10 Before finalizing the Master Plan all the stakeholders need to be consulted to
ensure that the cargo handling facilities are in keeping with the requirements of the
trade, modern practices and regulatory requirements.


Figure 6.3: SAPS Cargo Handling Terminal at Islamabad Airport








7. Peshawar International Airport

7.1 Peshawar airport also handles substantial volume of cargo by air. During 2004-
05 it handled 11,675 tonnes of cargo, which included 8,851 tonnes of international
cargo. While the volume of domestic cargo has remained around 3,000 tonnes, there
has been a consistent growth since 2000-01 in the volume of international cargo at
an average annual rate of about 19 % resulting in total cargo growth rate of about 12
%.



Table 7.1: Cargo Handled at Peshawar International Airport

 (Tonnes)
Year2000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalLoaded1,958 2,039 4,585 5,256 6,070
Un-loaded1,805 2,040 1,941 2,504 2,781
Transit- - - - -
Total3,763 4,079 6,526 7,760 8,851
DomesticLoaded973 952 682 571 909
Un-loaded1,986 2,286 2,413 2,075 1,915
Total2,959 3,238 3,095 2,646 2,824
Int'l + Domestic(incl. Transit)
Loaded2,931 2,991 5,267 5,827 6,979
Un-loaded3,791 4,326 4,354 4,579 4,696
Total6,722 7,317 9,621 10,406 11,675
Source: Civil Aviation Authority-
2,0004,0006,0008,00010,00012,00014,0002000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic




7.2 Assuming that the growth rate of last five years is maintained the cargo
throughput of Peshawar airport would increase from 11,675 tonnes in 2004-05 to
about 33,000 tonnes by 2015-16. The projected air cargo traffic for Peshawar airport
is shown in Figure 7.1. It may be noted that Peshawar is very well located for
airfreight of domestic as well as foreign cargo to CAR under multi-modal transport
system. This opportunity needs to be exploited.



Figure 7.1: Projected Throughput of Cargo at Peshawar Airport

-
10,00020,00030,00040,00050,00060,0002000-
012001-
022002-
032003-
042004-
052005-
062006-
072007-
082008-
092009-
102010-
112011-
122012-
132013-
142014-
152015-
162016-
172017-
182018-
192019-
20YearsTonnesInternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic




7.3 No statistical data regarding the commodity exports from Peshawar airport could
be made available by PRAL. Various sources indicated that the main exports from
Peshawar airport comprised fresh fruit and vegetables, animal casings, meat,
livestock, dairy products, honey, tobacco, carpets and precious and semi-precious
stones. Pharmaceuticals, surgical instruments, sports goods and leather garments
originating from Rawalpindi-Sialkot area were also exported through Peshawar
airport. The imports were mainly unaccompanied personal baggage and medicines.



7.4 PIA, Qatar Airways, Emirates, Gulf Air, Saudi Arabian Airlines and Aero Asia are
the main transporters of cargo in combination with their passenger services. Air Blue


has started to lift cargo on introduction of its service in 2005. Recently Etihad has
also started its service and started to lift cargo. In the past PIA has been carrying
over 50% of cargo. However, with introduction of services by other airlines its share
has been declining.



Table 7.2: Cargo Traffic by Airlines

(Tonnes)
Name of Airline/ Operators 2000 - 2001 2001 - 2002 2002 - 2003 2003 - 2004 2004 - 2005AERO ASIA AIRLINE 449 341 333 455 474
AIR BLUE - - - - 653
EMIRATES AIRLINES 931 485 589 794 1,220
GULF AIR 222 410 673 593 1,110
OMAN AIR 21 - - - -
PAKISTAN INTERNL AIRLINES 4,214 5,177 6,599 5,892 4,762
QATAR AIRWAYS 566 639 1,140 1,760 1,601
ROYAL AIRLINE - - 60 - -
SAUDI ARABIAN AIRLINES - - - 569 1,566
SHAHEEN AIR INTERNATIONAL 52 38 - 10 -
SHAHEEN AIRLINE KHI 265 228 225 333 290
Total 6,720 7,318 9,619 10,406 11,676

Source: CAA



7.5 PIA and Aero Asia handle their own cargo, while the other airlines make use of
the services of SAPS. The area available to PIA for its cargo terminal is restricted to
about 20,000 ft2, which is absolutely inadequate for carrying out the operations
efficiently. Covered areas are not adequate for storing the goods and getting them
processed through necessary operations and examined by Customs. All the work
has to be carried out by PIA and Customs staff in most uncomfortable environment
lacking the basic facilities. There is no weighbridge for weighing of cargo or the
scanner for security and Customs examination. Access to the terminal is through the
passenger car parking area which makes it very difficult for the trucks and trailers to
access the cargo terminal that has no parking space for these heavy vehicles.







7.6 Compared to that SAPS cargo terminal is spread over a much larger area of over
75,000 ft2. It has separate warehouses for the export and import cargo and open
space for the trucks and trailers. The terminal is also equipped with weighbridge,
modern scanner and other security features. Well equipped office space for the


SAPS, Customs and airlines staff is also available. It also has direct access for trucks
and trailers. The terminal is at present being utilized at about 50% capacity.



7.7 To relieve the problems being faced at PIA cargo terminal it would be advisable
to work out an arrangement whereby the under-utilized facilities of SAPS are also
used by PIA under a mutually agreed arrangement till a new cargo terminal for use of
PIA is built. It appears that some overtures in this direction had been made, but
because of the business rivalry of the two organizations an acceptable agreement
could not be reached.



7.8 A much larger cargo terminal with all modern facilities; including cold storage for
perishable commodities, strong room with lockers for precious commodities and
separated shed for livestock; needs to be developed for PIA operations. At present
this has been obstructed because a substantial part of land allocated to CAA has
been occupied by ASF. The Airport Manager, Peshawar has put up a proposal for
expansion of the airport terminal by relocating ASF to PAF land and the present car
park to army open land in the vicinity. It has been indicated that the proposal is being
discussed by CAA with the concerned PAF and Army officials and plans for
expansion and Upgradation of the airport involving building of a new terminal and
dedicated cargo facilities have been prepared. Considering that all the organizations
involved to enable execution of the plan are under the administrative control of the
Ministry of Defence it should not be too difficult to get the proposal finalized and
executed. It would greatly relieve the problems being faced at Peshawar airport.









8. Sialkot International Airport

8.1 Sialkot is a fast growing industrial city of Punjab. It specializes in production of export
oriented high value goods like surgical instruments, sports goods and leather garments. The
industry is lead by a dynamic Chamber of Commerce and Industry, which has developed a
self financing and self-help culture. To develop the city the industrialists initially contributed
0.5% of their income towards the Development Fund. This contribution has now been
reduced to 0.25%. City hospital, college and school have been built out of this fund.



8.2 To enable expeditious transport of goods for export to sea and air ports Sialkot Dry Port
has been established in the private sector by taking land on lease from Pakistan Railways.
The dry port owns a fleet of 100 flat-bed trucks for transport of the containers. Over 40 tons
per day of Sialkot products are shipped abroad by air. The airports of Karachi, Lahore,
Islamabad and Peshawar are used for these shipments. By arranging shipments through
distant airports the exporters cannot exercise satisfactory control over it. Furthermore,
damages and pilferages affect reputation of the exporters.



8.3 To overcome this situation SCCI decided to establish an airport at Sialkot. A private
limited company by the name of Sialkot International Airport (Pvt) Ltd. was established and a
Memorandum of Understanding was signed between the Government of Pakistan and SIAL,
whereby 1,036 acres land for the airport was made available by the Government of Punjab
and other government organizations like Customs, CAA, ASF and Pakistan Meteorological
Department (PMD) agreed to provide the necessary services for operation of the airport.



8.4 Any industrialist from Sialkot contributing Rs 5,000,000 towards the equity of SIAL is
entitled to become a member of the Board of Directors. At present there are 227 directors
who have contributed this amount.



8.5 Work on construction of the airport started in January 2003. The runway capable of
landing the larges aircraft has already been built. Building of the control tower, necessary
offices and two cargo warehouses of 1,000 m2 each are nearing completion. Essential
equipment for operation of the airport and handling of cargo has been imported. It is
intended to commence the operation for cargo transport and subsequently develop it for
passenger transport. It is intended to operate the first flight in December 2006 or early 2007.



8.6 The airport is well laid out and there is provision for construction of 20 cargo warehouses
of 1,000 m2 capacity. PIA, SAPS, DHL have already shown interest in establishing their
warehouses. SIAL is negotiating with various airlines to operate their services for Sialkot
airport. Success of the airport will depend on attracting sufficient number of airline services
to make the operation viable. The management of SIAL is very optimistic. SCCI is of the
opinion that operation of the airport at Sialkot would enable them to enhance their exports
and the volume of air cargo will increase three to four folds of the present level.










Figure 8.1: Plan of Sialkot International Airport




9. Multan International Airport

9.1 At present Multan airport is handling a limited volume of cargo, most of which is
domestic. Total cargo handled during 2004-05 was 1,623 tonnes. Out of this the
international cargo was limited to only 212 tonnes.



Table 9.1: Cargo handled at Multan International Airport

 (Tonnes)
Year2000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalLoaded108 13 - 60 208
Un-loaded8 2 1 4 4
Transit- - - - -
Total116 15 1 64 212
DomesticLoaded628 705 730 718 892
Un-loaded641 539 595 702 519
Total1,269 1,244 1,325 1,420 1,411
Int'l + Domestic(incl. Transit)
Loaded736 718 730 778 1,100
Un-loaded649 541 596 706 523
Total1,385 1,259 1,326 1,484 1,623
Source: Civil Aviation Authority-
2004006008001,0001,2001,4001,6001,8002000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic




9.2 During the period 2000-05 the cargo movement from Multan airport has not
shown any consistent growth pattern. Therefore, the past data could not be used for
making growth projections. However, Multan is surrounded by large agricultural area.
Kucchi Canal being developed at present will further increase this agricultural
producing belt. Mango is the main produce of this area. At present it is transported to
Karachi and Lahore by land for onward transport to distant destinations by air. Direct
shipment by air from Multan has not been possible because the runway length does
not allow landing of wide bodied aircrafts. The smaller aircrafts landing at Multan
airport do not have the capacity for carriage of cargo.



9.3 A decision has already been taken to extend the runway and build a new terminal
with cargo handling facilities. PCI has been approved. CAA is at present in the
process of selecting a consultant for planning and designing a new terminal building
with other allied facilities including a cargo terminal of international standard. The
project is estimated to cost about US$ 50 million and completed in 2009.



Figure 9.1: Projected Throughput of Cargo at Multan Airport

-
5,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,00035,0002000-
012001-
022002-
032003-
042004-
052005-
062006-
072007-
082008-
092009-
102010-
112011-
122012-
132013-
142014-
152015-
162016-
172017-
182018-
192019-
20YearsTonnesInternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic




9.4 Once the new facilities are established the airlines will have to be persuaded to
operate the services with wide bodied aircrafts. On the assumption that with
availability of new facilities the wide bodied aircrafts will start calling at Multan airport
the growth of international cargo has been projected at 20% during 2005-06,
gradually declining to 10% by 2015-16 and thereafter maintaining this growth rate.
For the domestic cargo the average growth rate of 3.2% for the past five years has


been used for future projections. On these assumptions the cargo handled at Multan
airport will increase from 1,623 tonnes in 2004-05 to about 22,000 tonnes in 2015-16.



9.5 Only partial data of exports for the months of April, May and June 2006 could be
made available by PRAL. This shows apparel, clothing, made ups, footwear and food
items as the main exports from Multan. The market sources indicated textile made
ups, embroidered clothing, leather garments, shoes and sheep casings to be the
major exports from Multan. There was much scope for export of fruits and
vegetables, especially mangoes. But because of lack of cold storage facilities and
wide bodied aircraft to lift the cargo this potential was not being exploited. Pakistan
Horticulture Development and Export Board (PHDEB) has planned an Agro
Processing Zone in Multan. It is likely to be located in Phase II of the Industrial Estate
not too far from the airport. The proposed facilities will include post-harvest
treatment, cold storage and processing.



Table 9.2: Commodity Exports from Multan Airport (Partial Data)

 Figure in million rupees
CommodityApril, May, June 2006Food items10.2Textile & fibre.2Carpets & other textile flooring1.2Apparel, clothing & madeups79.8Footwear, Guaitars & parts32.8Gems & jewellery.3Miscellaneous items.1
TOTAL124.6

Source: Compiled by study team from PRAL data



9.6 Only PIA and Aero Asia have been operating from Multan airport. Recently Aero
Asia has also suspended its service. Inducing more airlines to operate their services
from Multan will be critical for increasing the export of cargo by air from Multan.
Multan airport at present has about 5,000 ft2 of open plinth area and about 4,000 ft2
of covered area for handling cargo. In case of the projected growth in cargo traffic
being achieved the cargo handling facilities would need to be enhanced to meet the
requirements.



Table 9.3: Cargo traffic by Airlines at Multan Airport

(Tonnes)
Name of Airline/ Operators 2000 - 2001 2001 - 2002 2002 - 2003 2003 - 2004 2004 - 2005AERO ASIA AIRLINE 140 69 77 238 107
PAKISTAN INTERNL AIRLINES 1,245 1,191 1,247 1,246 1,516
Total 1,385 1,260 1,324 1,484 1,623

Source: CAA










10. Faisalabad International Airport

10.1 Faisalabad airport handles limited volume of cargo. During 2004-05 only 1,223
tonnes of total cargo was handled at Faisalabad. For the period 2001-05 the
domestic cargo has varied between 1,070 and 1,226 tonnes. The cargo carrying
capacity of the passenger aircrafts operating on this route has been the limiting
factor. The international cargo has been negligible.



Table 10.1: Cargo Handled at Faisalabad International Airport

 (Tonnes)
Year2000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalLoaded6 39 - 1 6
Un-loaded42 10 - 3 6
Transit- - - - -
Total48 49 - 4 12
DomesticLoaded946 669 729 812 779
Un-loaded512 401 394 423 432
Total1,458 1,070 1,123 1,235 1,211
Int'l + Domestic(incl. Transit)
Loaded952 708 729 813 785
Un-loaded554 411 394 426 438
Total1,506 1,119 1,123 1,239 1,223
Source: Civil Aviation Authority-
2004006008001,0001,2001,4001,6002000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic




10.2 With the development of motorways to Lahore and Islamabad the airports in
these cities with international flights are now within easy access involving a few hours
drive. Another airport at Sialkot is being developed and this will also be easily
accessible to the exporters from Faisalabad. Therefore Faisalabad offers little
potential for handling international cargo. For the domestic cargo over the period
2001-05 there has been an average annual growth of 3.1%. This growth rate has
been applied for the projections of domestic cargo. On this assumption the cargo
handled at Faisalabad airport will increase from 1,223 tonnes in 2004-05 to about
1,700 tonnes in 2015-16.



Figure 10.1: Projected Throughput of Cargo at Faisalabad Airport

-
5001,0001,5002,0002000-
012001-
022002-
032003-
042004-
052005-
062006-
072007-
082008-
092009-
102010-
112011-
122012-
132013-
142014-
152015-
162016-
172017-
182018-
192019-
20YearsTonnesInternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic




10.3 Faisalabad is the centre of textile industry in Pakistan. Most of the export
products are transported by sea. The items to be delivered urgently air freighted from
Karachi, Lahore or Islamabad. The data provided by PRAL shows that the limited
shipments made by air from Faisalabad during 2003-05 consisted of apparel,
clothing, made ups and cotton cloth.














Table 10.2: Commodity Exports from Faisalabad Airport

Commodity200320042005Apparel, clothing & made ups15.6183.3140.5Cotton cloth4.311.44.4Miscellaneous2.2147.148.2Total22.1341.9193.2Figures in million Rupees


Source: Compiled by study team from PRAL data



10.4 The main carriers from Faisalabad airport have been PIA and Aero Asia.
Recently Air Blue has also introduced a daily domestic service. The main complaint
of the airlines is that the cargo sheds are placed far away from the apron and these
create difficulty in handling the cargo. The cargo sheds need to be shifted close to
the apron.



Table 10.3: Cargo Traffic by Airlines at Faisalabad Airport

(Tonnes)
Name of Airline/ Operators 2000 - 2001 2001 - 2002 2002 - 2003 2003 - 2004 2004 - 2005AERO ASIA AIRLINE - 5 22 69 103
PAKISTAN INTERNL AIRLINES 1,507 1,113 1,101 1,170 1,120
Total 1,507 1,118 1,123 1,239 1,223

Source: CAA


















11. Quetta International Airport

11.1 Quetta airport is also handling a limited volume of cargo. Most of this cargo is
domestic. During 2004-05 total volume of 1,515 tonnes of cargo was handled. Out of
this 1,446 tonnes was domestic cargo. The international cargo mainly comprises
unaccompanied baggage of passengers from Dubai.



Table 11.1: Cargo Handled at Quetta International Airport

 (Tonnes)
Year2000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalLoaded31 16 - 6 3
Un-loaded20 10 24 42 66
Transit- - - - -
Total51 26 24 48 69
Domestic1Loaded487 487 487 578 645
Un-loaded727 705 727 720 801
Total1,214 1,192 1,214 1,298 1,446
Int'l + Domestic(incl. Transit)
Loaded518 503 518 584 648
Un-loaded747 715 747 762 867
Total1,265 1,218 1,265 1,346 1,515
Source: Civil Aviation Authority-
2004006008001,0001,2001,4001,6002000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic




11.2 Main produce of Quetta region is fruit and seasonal vegetables mainly
harvested in the summer months of June, July and August. No statistics of the
exports from Quetta were available. The market sources indicated that grapes are
exported to Bangladesh. Till a few years back these were exported by air. But, with
introduction of refrigerated containers and good road connection to Karachi, the
grapes are now exported to Bangladesh by sea in refrigerated containers on the
basis of door to door service. The production of fruit and vegetables is very much
dependent on the weather. Drought of a few years back greatly damaged the
orchards, adversely affecting their output.



11.3 As the fruit processing facilities are not yet available in the growing areas, the
fruits and vegetables are transported by road to the markets in Karachi and Lahore.
To attract air freight PIA offers special concessionary rates for air freight of cargo to
Karachi, Lahore and Dubai. The domestic cargo is also picked up and delivered at
PIA terminal in town. Some times fruit and vegetables are air freighted to Karachi for
processing and export by air. The study team witnessed a consignment of coriander
(dhanya) being air freighted to Karachi by PIA.



11.4 Besides the horticultural products, occasionally machinery items are exported
and imported to meet immediate repairs and replacement requirements of some
plants.



Figure 11.1: Projected Throughput of Cargo at Quetta Airport

-
5001,0001,5002,0002,5003,0003,5004,0002000-
012001-
022002-
032003-
042004-
052005-
062006-
072007-
082008-
092009-
102010-
112011-
122012-
132013-
142014-
152015-
162016-
172017-
182018-
192019-
20YearsTonnesInternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic



11.5 The average annual growth rate during the period 2001-05 for the total
international cargo was 12.8% and for the domestic cargo 4.9%. Future projections
have been worked out using the same growth rates. On these assumptions the total
air cargo handled at Quetta airport will increase from 1,515 tonnes in 2004-05 to
about 2,700 tonnes in 2015-16.



11.6 PIA has been the consistent service provider at Quetta airport. A number of
other airlines have also been providing occasional service. Recently Air Blue has
started a daily service between Quetta and Karachi and Shaheen Airline twice a
week service to Lahore.



Table 11.2: Cargo Traffic by Airlines at Quetta International Airport

(Tonnes)
Name of Airline/ Operators 2000 - 2001 2001 - 2002 2002 - 2003 2003 - 2004 2004 - 2005AIR BLUE - - - - 123
ASMAN AIRLINE 37 - - - -
INT'L COMMITTEE RED CROSS - 10 - - -
PAKISTAN INTERN'L AIRLINES 1,228 1,208 81 1,346 1,387
SHAHEEN AIR INTERNATIONAL - - - - 5
Total 1,265 1,218 81 1,346 1,515

Source: CAA



11.7 The exports and imports have to be cleared at the airport because of the
Customs requirements. Quetta airport has a 15*25 ft warehouse for import
consignments and a 12*12 ft warehouse for export consignments. A 21*18 ft cool
room fitted with 2 air conditioners has also been built at the demand of exporters, but
it has not been used. The traders complain that the bank and quarantine facilities are
not available at the airport and much time is wasted in going to town for these. They
also complain that in case of a flight getting delayed the cargo is left in the open and
it gets damaged. Suitable sheds may be provided to avoid damage to cargo. The
scanner installed at the airport is very old of 8 kg capacity. A modern scanner of
larger capacity is needed to avoid damage to cargo by opening it for inspection. The
weighing machine is also of very small capacity. A larger capacity weighing machine
is required.


12. Gwadar International Airport

12.1 Gwadar has a small airport with short runway, which restricts it use to small
aircraft. PIA has been operating its service to Gwadar with Fokker aircraft. Because
of limited cargo carrying capacity of these aircraft very little cargo is handled at
Gwadar airport. Over the last five years the total cargo handled annually has been
around 80 tonnes. The unloaded cargo on international and domestic services is
mainly unaccompanied baggage. The loaded cargo is mainly fish sent by local
influential persons to their friends as gift.



Table 12.1 Cargo Handled at Gwadar International Airport

 (Tonnes)
Year2000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalLoaded1 1 3 3 1
Un-loaded31 25 21 22 2
Transit- - - - -
Total32 26 24 25 3
DomesticLoaded23 15 19 10 17
Un-loaded28 32 37 46 50
Total51 47 56 56 67
Int'l + Domestic(incl. Transit)
Loaded24 16 22 13 18
Un-loaded59 57 58 68 52
Total83 73 80 81 70
Source: Civil Aviation Authority-
1020304050607080902000-012001-022002-032003-042004-05InternationalDomesticInt'l +
Domestic




12.2 After recent grounding of Fokker aircrafts PIA is now operating the service with
the recently acquired ATR 42-500 aircrafts. Air Blue has also started a service from
Karachi to Gwadar with 17 seats Beachcraft 1900. These aircraft do not have the
capacity for carrying cargo. Moreover with development of Coastal Highway, which
enables transport from Karachi to Gwadar within 8 to 10 hours, at present there is not
much demand for carriage of air cargo.



12.3 With development of Gwadar port, Gwadar is being transformed from a fishing
village to an industrial and commercial centre for transport of cargo to CAR. First
phase of Gwadar port is nearing completion. GDA has prepared a Master Plan for
development of Gwadar and efforts are being made to develop necessary
infrastructure for the entrepreneurs to be attracted to invest in establishing industries
and other commercial enterprises. 6,000 acres area has also been earmarked for
establishment of a new international airport. CAA is already in the process of
acquiring the land and working out a plan for development of this airport.



12.4 To provide land connectivity to CAR through shorter routes a highway from
Gwadar to Chaman is being developed through Turbat, Hoshab, Panjgur, Naag,
Basima and Sorab. To provide access to Torkham through Indus Highway another
road link is planned from Turbat to Hoshab, Awran, Khuzdar and Ratodero.



12.5 Electric supply has been arranged from Iran Work is in hand for supply of gas,
and arrangements are being made for installation of a 2 million gallons per day
capacity desalination plant for ensuring water supply. All these are the basic
requirements for the industrial activity to take off. At present the smuggled diesel and
petrol is freely available at relatively cheaper price of Rs. 15 to 25 per litre.



12.6 The main business activity that is taking place at present is the sale and
purchase of land by the so called ‘land mafia’. This is escalating the price of land to
uneconomic levels. Measures need to be adopted to make sure that the land is
allotted to only those who have a genuine requirement for establishing an industry or


some other commercial enterprise; and in case of the indicated enterprise not being
established within a specified period the allotment may be cancelled.



12.7 Another major hindrance in starting industrial and commercial activity is the non-
availability of local skilled personnel. There is an urgent need for establishing a
polytechnic institute in Gwadar to develop skills in basic trades like electrician,
mason, plumber, carpenter, mechanic etc. so that the workers may become available
for constructing the industrial establishments.



12.8 Moreover, the area adjacent to the port reserved for industries needs to be
declared as a Free Trade Zone, free from duties and local taxes, like Jabal Ali in
Dubai to attract investment.



12.9 Once the industry starts to take off the time will be ripe for the new airport to
come in operation. The new airport should be planned with adequate provision for
modern cargo handling facilities so that it may be used for trade with CAR by air.




New
Airport








13. Air Cargo Business Process

13.1 Efficient handling of cargo requires expeditions completion of all the business
processes involved in getting the cargo on board the aircraft after its arrival at the
airport for the export cargo and clearance of cargo from the airport after its unloading
from the aircraft for the import cargo. Nearly 98% of all air cargo is handled at
Karachi, Lahore, Islamabad and Peshawar airports. An effort was made to make an
assessment of the time involved in completion of export and import business
processes at these airports. Unfortunately no records are maintained for completion
of business processes. Therefore, reliance had to be made on the empirical
information received from the concerned agencies. And even that information was
not complete in many respects and varied from agency to agency. On the basis of
whatever information became available the charts produced below have been
prepared for the export and import business processes.



Chart 1. Export Business Process

Sl.Concerned KarachiLahoreIslamabadPeshawarNo.organization Approx. Time Approx. Time Approx. Time Approx. Time1Arrival of loaded cargo truckShipper / agent20 - 30 mins1 - 2 hrs1/2 hr2 hrs2Filing of shipment BillShipper / agent ---20 - 30 mins3 hrsNot indicated(Registration to obtain machine No.)
3Entry in Air Freight Unit
- Customs inspectionCustoms10 minsVaribale1/2 hrNot indicated
- CAA Security checkCAA ---
4Weighing of truck30 - 60 mins10 - 30 mins1/2 hr10 minStacking / labelling in examination areaAirline / GHA1 hrsANF20 - 30 mins30 mins1 hr.Not indicated6Quality certification1/2 hr
- AnimalsConcerned
- PlantsGovernmentalVariableVariableVariable
- FishOfficesNot indicatedNot indicatedNot indicated
- Agricultural produce7Customs formalitiesNot indicated
- Composition checks
- Valuations checksCustoms2 - 6 hrs30 mins - 2 hrs2- 3 hrs
- Duties / Taxes etc.
- Allow loadingShipper / agent1 - 4 hrs.5 hrs1 hr. before arr.
/ airlineof aircraft9Security requirements24 hrs24 hrs
- Cooling periodAirline 24 hrs24 hrs24 hrs
- Electronic screeningAirline Subject to volume1 hr15 min / ton10Palletzing / loading on aircraftAirline 2 - 3 hrs30 mins to 2 hrs2 hrs1 hr/3 ton pallet
ANF = Anti Narcotic Force, CAA = Civil Aviation Authority, GHA = Ground Handling AgencyProcessNarcotics check58Handing over to airline




Chart 2: Import Business Process

Sl.KarachiLahoreIslamabadPeshawarNo. Operator Approx. Time Approx. Time Approx. Time Approx. Time1Off loading30 mins - 2 hrs.2- 3 hrs45 mins
- Segregation of cargoAirline / GHA2 hrs3 hrs1 hr.
- AFU (Commercial)2 hrs8:30 - 16:30
- Grill (unaccompanied)1/2 hr - 1 hr.8:30 - 16:30
- ICG (immediate clearance)1/2 hr.
- Bond (Airline equipment)1/2 hr.
- Transit (Domestic distribution)45 mins - 1 hr.2 hrs2Delivery order issuanceAirline10 mins10 mins3 hrsOffice hrs3Customs processCustoms4 - 6 hrsVariable4 hrsVariable(Examination, appraisement,
evaluation of duties & taxes)
4Provincial stamps & dutiesProv. Govt.10 mins ---------
5Thoroughput chargesCAA10 mins ---------
ANF = Anti Narcotic Force, CAA = Civil Aviation Authority, GHA = Ground Handling AgencyProcess





13.2 The organizations working at the airports like CAA, Customs, airlines and the
ground handling agents have their own computerized system, but these are not
interlinked with each other. To simplify and expedite the cargo handling operations at
the airports it is imported that IT systems of all the agencies working at the airports
are integrated in to a single window operation. PACCS of Customs developed under
CARE programme offers an excellent opportunity for achieving this objective.
PACCS needs to be extended to all the airports by Pakistan Customs at the earliest
and arrangements made for the IT systems of all the other organizations to be
integrated with it.






14. Recommendations

General

1. PACCS may be introduced by Pakistan Customs at all airports and IT systems of
CAA, airlines, air cargo agents and cargo handling agents may be integrated with
it to function as a Single Window.



2. Aircraft landing charges and fuel prices charged at Pakistani airports may be
compared with the regional airports and rationalized to make them comparable
with the charges at the regional airports.



3. CAA may establish suitable adjudication mechanism at each airport for quick
resolution of disputes relating to throughput charges.



4. Modern scanners of adequate capacity for the cargo load may be installed at all
airports for screening of cargo.



5. All stakeholders should be consulted during the planning stages of new airports
at Islamabad and Gwadar and new terminal facilities at other ports to ensure that
the cargo handling facilities are adequate and in keeping with the latest cargo
handling practices and regulatory requirements.



6. PIA may introduce appropriate security arrangements in its aircraft for transport
of gems and jewelry at a reasonable cost.



7. The procedures of all organizations involved in transport supply chain may be
streamlined to facilitate development of sea-air-road multi-modal transport
logistics.



Karachi Airport

8. To eliminate damage and pilferage of cargo the backyard area of airlines
warehouses in CAA Cargo Complex AFU may be covered with sheds and caged.
The sheds in examination area of AFU also need to be extended on both sides to
cover the open area between the shed and the airline warehouses and the open
space for receiving the cargo. Security against pilferage may be strengthened. A
modern scanner of adequate capacity may be installed.



9. PIA Cargo Complex may be expanded to integrate all export, import and
domestic cargo operations at one place. Necessary funding arrangement for
early execution of this expansion may be made. There should be suitable
provision for temperature controlled cool rooms for perishable commodities,
chiller room for medicines, strong room with lockers for valuables, modern
scanners and closed circuit TV monitoring.



10. The scattered cargo handling facilities at Karachi Airport may be integrated by
developing a Cargo Village with modern warehousing and cold storage, and all
other modern equipment required in such a facility. Necessary offices, other
amenities and parking spaces may also be provided.






Lahore Airport

11. Construction of a permanent Customs block at the Cargo Complex of Allama
Iqbal international Airport may be taken in hand immediately. In the meanwhile
suitable offices may be made available for the Customs staff to carry out their
functions in a comfortable environment.



12. Suitable cold rooms for perishable commodities, chillers for medicines, strong
rooms with lockers, scanners, and close circuit TV surveillance may be provided
in the warehouses of all cargo handling agents including PIA. Separate space
may be allocated for hazardous cargo.



13. Banking facilities, offices for air cargo agents, rest rooms for drivers, parking area
for container trailers and other necessary amenities may be provided.



Islamabad Airport

14. PIA Cargo Terminal may be expanded by getting some more space allocated for
it from the airport apron area, and the layout of the terminal improved on
scientific lines to enable proper segregation, sorting, examination and flow of
cargo. Weighbridge and modern scanner of adequate capacity may be provided.
Close circuit TV surveillance may be introduced. Separate provision may be
made for handling livestock and hazardous cargo.



15. At the new Islamabad Airport a modern cargo complex may be built along with
the airport terminal during the initial stages of building the airport. All
stakeholders may be consulted during the planning stage.



Peshawar Airport

16. To meet immediate requirement of smoothly handling PIA cargo suitable
arrangements on mutually acceptable terms may be worked out between PIA
and SAPS to make use of the spare capacity in SAPS premises for handling
export cargo of PIA.



17. Arrangements may be worked out by the Ministry of Defence in coordination with
CAA, ASF, Army and Air Force to expand the Peshawar Airport Terminal as
proposed by CAA Works Section, Peshawar Airport and all modern facilities may
be provided in the expanded cargo terminal.



Sialkot Airport

18. SIAL may be provided all the facilities for efficient operation of Sialkot Airport as
agreed in the memorandum of Understanding between SIAL and the
Government of Pakistan.



Multan Airport

19. Runway may be extended and new cargo terminal built as already approved by
the Government.



20. Modern scanner, weighbridge, CCTV and other modern facilities may be
provided in the new cargo terminal.



Faisalabad Airport

21. Cargo shed may be shifted close to the apron if practicable.




Quetta Airport

22. Installation of larger capacity modern scanner and weighbridge may be
considered on the basis of operational requirements.



Gwadar Airport

23. At Gwadar basic issues relate to development of infrastructure for attracting
industrial and commercial activity. The important actions that need to be taken
are:



(i) Curb escalation of land prices by restricting transfer of property and making it
incumbent on the allottees to establish within a specified period the enterprise
for which the land has been allotted.



(ii) Establish a polytechnic institute for training of craftsmen like electricians,
masons, plumbers, carpenters, mechanics etc. so that the development
activity can take place.



(iii) Make the industrial area a Free Trade Zone exempt from levy of Customs
duty and other taxes like Jabal Ali in Dubai to attract investment.



24. New Airport may be built to commence operation when the industry starts to take
off and a modern cargo complex may be built along with the airport.






Annex-I



LIST OF PARTICIPANTS OF THE MEETING HELD ON 29-04-2006

TO DISCUSS AIR CARGO HANDLING FACILITIES AT AIRPORTS



1.

Syed Asif Shah, In chair

Secretary Commerce



2.

Mr. Qamar H. Jafarey

Manager (Cargo), PIA, Karachi



3.

Mr. Tariq Ahad Nawaz

Chief (IC), CBR



4.

Mr. Muhammad Saeed Asad,

Secretary (Export), CBR



5.

Mr. Alqera Atiq,

General Manager (Coordination), Civil Aviation Authority, Karachi



6.

Mr. Shahid Anwar Khan

DS (P&D), Aviation Wing, Ministry of Defence



7.

Mr. Muhammad Uris Jumani

Director, Federal Bureau of Statistics



8.

Ch. Mohammad Saeed

President, FPCCI, Karachi



9.

Mr. Mohammad Iqbal

Chief Operation Officer, Pakistan Horticulture Development and Export
Board, Lahore



10.

Mr. K. K. Suri

Consultant, Export Promotion Bureau, Karachi



11.

Mr. Muhammad Ashraf Khan,

Sr. JS (Import/Trade Policy), Ministry of Commerce



12.

Mr. Abrar Ahmad Khan

JS (Export), Ministry of Commerce



13.

Syed Irtiqa Ahmed Zaidi

Economic Consultant, Ministry of Commerce



14.

Mr. Samiullah

Deputy Chief (Import), Ministry of Commerce



15.

Mr. Qaseem A. Subhani

Assistant Chief (Research), Ministry of Commerce




Annex-II



TOR FOR THE STUDY ON THE CREATION/ IMPROVEMENT OF CARGO HANDLING
FACILITIES AT AIRPORTS IN PAKISTAN



Ministry of Commerce intends to make projections of the requirements of air cargo
handling facilities required at all the airports of Pakistan for the next ten years in order to
facilitate quick transportation of commercial goods. In this connection the Ministry of
Commerce has decided to commission a short-term study to assess the existing cargo
handling facilities and the facilities required in the future at all our airports. The
consultants would be hired for the purpose to complete the study in 4 week’s time, and
will cover the following in the study:



1. An assessment of the major air cargo generation points/industries, nature of
cargo, quality of packaging and existing capacity/potential of import and export
markets.



2. A thorough assessment of air cargo handling facilities presently available at each
of the airports in Pakistan, and future requirements.



3. An assessment of the volume and nature of cargo handled at each airport during
the last five years (with year-wise breakup), and the volume of cargo that could
not be handled due to lack of capacity at the airports.



4. An assessment of the volume and nature of exportable commodities being
produced in the respective surrounding areas of each airport.



5. An assessment of the requirement of cargo handling facilities at each of the
airports for handling commercial cargo for the next 10 years for domestic as well
as international trade.



6. The existing facilities and those required in the future for handling of perishable
commodities should also be covered in the study.



7. For the purpose of collecting data, the Consultant will interact with Exporters,
Federation of Pakistan Chambers of Commerce & Industries, Pakistan
International Freight Forwarders Association and Government Departments, like
Ministry of Defence, Civil Aviation Authority, Pakistan International Airlines,
Central Board of Revenue, Statistics Division, National Logistic Cell, Export
Promotion Bureau, Pakistan Horticulture Development & Export Board, etc.

_________


Annex-III



Organizations and Persons Contacted



Karachi:

(1) Mr. Tahir Qamar

General Manager (MIS)

Civil Aviation Authority

Terminal 1, Karachi Airport, Karachi

Tel: 924 8792, Fax: 924 8794



(2) Mr. Ansar Zaidi

Corporate Manager (MIS)

Civil Aviation Authority

Terminal 1, Karachi Airport, Karachi

Tel: 924 8187



(3) Mr. Khalid Mahmood

Statistical Officer

Federal Bureau of Statistics

1-B, Sindhi Muslim Cooperative Housing
Society, Karachi

Tel: 438 8748 Ext. 313



(4) Mr. Arshad Awan

Sr. Project Manager

Pakistan Revenue Automation (Pvt) Ltd.

Customs House,

Karachi

Tel: 921 4133



(5) Syed Yousuf Abbas

Airport Manager & First Class Magistrate

Civil Aviation Authority

Level VI, Jinnah International Airport, Karachi

Ph: 467 1657, 924 8690 Fax: 924 8146



(6) Mr. Ghaffar A. Mughal

Senior Manager – Cargo Complex

Export Cargo Terminal, Jinnah International
Airport, Karachi.

Ph: 467 1850, 467 1719, 467 1720; Cell:
0333 313 2163



(7) Mr. M. Shahid Latif

General Manager Cargo

Pakistan International Airlines

Head Office, Karachi Airport, Karachi.

Ph: 457 1844, 467 4017; Cell: 0300 826 8187



(8) Mr. Qamar H. Jafarey

Product Manager Cargo

Pakistan International Airlines

Head Office, Karachi Airport, Karachi.

Ph: 467 4264, 467 4582



(9) Mr. Akbar Abdullah

Vice President

The Federation of Pakistan Chambers of
Commerce & Industry

Federation House,

Main Clifton Road, P.O. Box 13875,

Karachi

Ph: 587 3691, 93 – 94, Fax: 587 4332

(10) Mr. Jamshed Qureshi

Patron in Chief

Air Cargo Agents Association of Pakistan

C-32-2, KDA Scheme No. 1,

Main Karsaz Road, Karachi

Ph: 021-4540971-4, Fax: 021-4542447

(11) Mr. Zafar Mahmood

Vice Chairman

Export Promotion Bureau

5th Floor, Block A, Finance and Trade Centre,
Shara-e-Faisal, Karachi

Ph: 920 6484, Fax: 9206461

(12) Dr. Muhammad Usman

Director

Export Promotion Bureau

5th Floor, Block A, Finance and Trade
Centre, Shara-e-Faisal, Karachi

Ph: 920 6812, Fax: 9206461


(13) Mr. K. K. Suri

Int’l Trade & Economic Consultant –
Consultant to Minister of State & Chairman

Export Promotion Bureau

Government of Pakistan, Karachi

Ph: 920 6487 – 90 Ext 242, 920 1504,

Fax: 664 7515



(14) Agha Shahab Ahmed Khan

Member Managing Committee, Chairman
Export, Sub-Committee (2005-06)

Karachi Chamber of Commerce & Industry

Aiwan-e-Tijarat Road, Karachi-74000

Ph: 2416091-94 2415435-39

Fax: 2416095, 2410587 – 0300-2020840

Email: ccikar@cyber.net.pk



(15) Mr. Mohammad Salim Kapadia

Member Managing Committee, Former SVP

Karachi Chamber of Commerce & Industry

Aiwan-e-Tijarat Road, Karachi-74000

Ph: 2416091-94 2415435-39 Fax: 2416095,
2410587

Email: ccikar@cyber.net.pk ;
sessa@sat.net.pk

(16) Mr. Abdul Majeed Memon

Sr. V. President

Karachi Chamber of Commerce & Industry

Aiwan-e-Tijarat Road, Karachi-74000

Ph: 2416091-94 2415435-39 Dir: 2411583
Fax: 2416095, 2410587

Email: ccikar@cyber.net.pk

(17) Mr. M. Muzzamil Husain

Executive Director

Shahi Textiles

L-25C/22, Federal B Area, Karachi-75950

Ph: 6343601-4 Fax: 6312522–

Email: shahi@gerrys.net;
muzzammil@shahitextiles.com

(18) Mr. Babar Badat, Chairman, PIFFA

M.D., Transfreight Corporation (Pvt.) Ltd

8-B, 2nd Floor, Pak Chambers, 23 West
Wharf Road, Karachi

Ph: 231 5034-6 Fax: 2204576-2202105-
2310404; 0300-8225222

Email: transfrt@cyber.net.pk

(19) Mr. Salim R. Baxamoosa

Chief Executive

Universal Freight Systems (Pvt) Ltd.

Freight House, 50-H, Block-6, PECHS,
Karachi

Ph: 4538361, 64, 65 Fax: 4549515

Email: salim@ufs.com.pk



(20) Mr. Ufaq Ali

General Manager –Pakistan

Gerry’s – Dnata

5041 Jinnah Terminal, Karachi Airport,

Ph: 4671551 Fax: 4582262

Email: uada@cyber.net.pk

(21) Mr. Khalid Mahmood

Statistical Officer

Federal Bureau of Statistics

Government of Pakistan

1-B, SMCHS, Karachi-74400

Ph: 4388748, Ext. 323 Fax: 4523819



(22) Mr. Yousuf Khan

Officer

Pakistan Revenue Automation (Pvt) Ltd.

New Customs House, Karachi

Ph: 111-772-772 Cell: 0300-2473731



(23) Mr. Shabir Ahmad

Chairman

Pakistan Bedwear Exporters Association

11 Timber Pond

Keamari Road

Karachi

Ph: 285 1311-13 Fax: 285 1429

Email: dlnash@dlnash.com

(24) Mr. Mohsin Abbas Dharsi

Chairman

Air Cargo Agents Association of Pakistan

Fabeha Castle, 168 Block B

S.M.C.H.S.

Karachi

Tel : 453 4411 Fax : 455 4350

Email : mohsin@karachicargo.com


(25) Mr. Asif Bashir Ahmad

Director Plans and Development

Civil Aviation Authority of Pakistan

B-6, KDA Scheme 1

Shahrah-e-Faisal, Karsaz

Karachi

Tel: 431 3826 Fax: 431 3827

Cell: 0333-3221634/3222 4774

Email: asifba2002@hotmail.com

(26) Mr. Nusratullah Khan

Director Operations

Civil Aviation Authority of Pakistan

Level 6, Jinnah International Airport

Karachi

Tel: 924 8745/924 8778 Fax: 924 8744

Islamabad / Rawalpindi:

(1) Mr. Shahzada Bashir Ahmed

Cargo Terminal Manager

Pakistan International Airlines

Cargo Terminal, Islamabad Airport, Islamabad

Ph: 902 4388 Fax: 928 0978; Cell: 0300 526
9420



(2) Grp. Capt. (R) Qaiser Khan Yusaf Zai

Manager Cargo Services

Shaheen Airport Services

Islamabad International Airport, Rawalpindi

Ph: 559 0562, 559 0380,

Fax: 559 2340; Cell: 0333 522 5511

(3) Mr. Muhammad Ashfaq Hussain

Airport Manager

Civil Aviation Authority

Islamabad International Airport, Islamabad

Ph: 908 0337, 923 1202 Fax: 928 0339.



(4) Mr. Bashir Ahmed Sial

Commercial Officer

Civil Aviation Authority

Islamabad International Airport, Islamabad

Ph: 903 1269; Cell: 0345 5064306





(5) Mr. Majid Shabbir

Secretary

Islamabad Chamber of Commerce & Industry

Aiwan-e-Sanat-o-Tijarat Road, G – 8/1,
Islamabad, Pakistan

Ph: 225 0526, 225 3145, Fax: 225 2950; Cell:
0300 510 5424 & 0304 520 9190





(6) Mr. Qaiser Iqbal Raja

Senior Vice President

Customs House Agents Association

Suite 2, Ground Floor, Al-Syed Building,
Jilani Road, Opposite Shaheen Cargo

Complex, Islamabad International Airport,
Islamabad

Ph: 595 0070; Cell: 0300 856 3966



(7) Mr. Arif Khan

Chief Executive

Haven International Traders (Importers & Exporters)

Hafiz Building, Office # 3, Basement Main
Street, Opposite Shaheen Cargo

Complex, Islamabad International Airport,
Islamabad

Ph: 559 2017; Cell: 0345 507 2268



(8) Mr. Malik Ijaz Hussain

Malik & Co. (Customs, Clearing, Forwarding, Import & Export)

Office # 4, Saad Building, Opposite
Shaheen Cargo Complex, Islamabad

International Airport, Rawalpindi

Ph: 550 4585, Fax: 559 2397;

Cell: 0300 975 2661

(9) Mr. S. Akhtar H. Bukhari

Managing Director

Pakistan International Movers

(Customs, Clearing, Freight Forwarding & Shipping Agency)

Basement Shalimar House, Opposite
Shaheen Cargo Complex, Islamabad

International Airport, Rawalpindi

Ph: 595 0621, 550 6259 Fax: 559 9247;

Cell: 0333 510 7048

(10) Mr. Maqbool Hussain

Managing Director

Nobel International Services –

(International Freight Forwarders, Customs Clearance, Import, Export, Air/Sea/Land & Rebate Advisor)

#1 Chishti Plaza, Opposite Shaheen Cargo
Complex, Islamabad

International Airport, Rawalpindi

Ph: 559 2659, Fax: 550 6918;

Cell: 0300 955 3855


(11) Mr. Zubair Ahmed Malik

Vice President

The Federation of Pakistan Chambers of
Commerce & Industry

Islamabad Chamber of Commerce & Industry

Aiwan-e-Sanat-o-Tijarat Road, G – 8/1,
Islamabad, Pakistan

Ph: 225 0526, 225 3145, Fax: 225 2950





Peshawar:

(1) Sqn. Ldr. S. Zahoor Ali Shah (R)

Airport Manager

Civil Aviation Authority

Peshawar International Airport,

Peshawar

Ph: 921 1508, 921 1525 Fax: 921 1507.



(2) Mr. M. Nasar Khan

Cargo Manager

Pakistan International Airlines

33, The Mall, Peshawar – Pakistan

Ph: 921 2383, 921 2370 – 9 / 224

Fax: 921 2393

(3) Group Captain Fazl-e-Akbar (R)

General Manager

Shaheen Airport Services

Peshawar International Airport,

Peshawar

Ph: 527 8207, 528 5384 Fax: 527 2547;

Cell: 0333 914 2360.

(4) Mr. Zia-ul-Haq Sarhadi

Member Executive Committee,

Chairman – Railway, Dry Port Standing Committee ,

Sarhad Chamber of Commerce & Industry
Chairman – Frontier Customs Agents Group

Peshawar

Ph: 221 2980, 221 9280 Fax: 221 1980;
Cell: 0300 859 0110



(5) Mr. Ghazanfar Bilour

President

Sarhad Chamber of Commerce & Industry

Sarhad Chamber House, G T Road,
Peshawar, NWFP, Pakistan

Ph: 921 3313 – 15, Fax: 921 3316.



(6) Mr. Inayat Khan

Senior Vice President

Sarhad Chamber of Commerce & Industry

Sarhad Chamber House, G T Road,
Peshawar, NWFP, Pakistan

Ph: 921 3313 – 15 Fax: 921 3316.

(7) Mr. Khalid Sultan Khawaja

Member Managing Committee,

Chairman – Standing Committee on Customs & Dry Ports
(NWFP)

C/o. Tariq Sultan & Co.,

Hospital Road, Peshawar City, Pakistan

Ph: 221 2166 – 7, Fax: 221 3346

(8) Mr. Mohammad Asif Khan

Exporter

Continental Trading Corporation

Room # 12, 2nd Floor, Hussain Plaza,
Khyber Bazaar, Peshawar-25120, Pakistan

Ph: 256 3310, 256 3320 Fax: 221 8235.



(9) Mr. Faqir Hussain

Chairman

All Pakistan Commercial Exporters
Association

Suite # 1, 2nd Floor, Al-Jalil Market, Namak
Mandi, Peshawar, Pakistan

Ph: 221 3396, 256 8801 Fax: 221 3520;

Cell: 0300 859 8853, 0321 903 9999

(10) Mr. Atsif Rashid Khawaja

Chief Executive

Freight Systems (Pvt) Limited

9/10B, Al-Jalil Market, Namak Mandi,
Peshawar, Pakistan

Ph: 221 1588, 221 1589 Fax: 256 8432;
Cell: 0300 859 1588














Lahore:

(1) Mr. Sohail Ahmed Chohan

Deputy Airport Manager

Civil Aviation Authority

Allama Iqbal International Airport, Lahore

Ph: 924 0575, 924 0601 Ext: 3002



(2) Major (R) Nabeel Hassan

Cargo Manager

Civil Aviation Authority

Allama Iqbal International Airport, Lahore

Ph: 924 0601 Ext: 3058



(3) Mr. Abbas Ali Babar

AC Customs

LAFU

Allama Iqbal International Airport, Lahore

Ph: 924 0475



(4) Mr. Muhammad Mohsin Rafiq

DC Customs (Traffic)

Allama Iqbal International Airport, Lahore

Ph: 924 0471

(5) GP Capt (R) Younas

Senior Manager

SAPS

Allama Iqbal International Airport, Lahore

Ph: 663 2781



(6) Mr. Javed Saddiq

ATCO

Civil Aviation Authority

Allama Iqbal International Airport, Lahore

Ph: 924 0601 Ext: 2313

 (7) Mr. Muhammad Sarfraz

AM PIAC Cargo

Allama Iqbal International Airport, Lahore

Ph: 903 44364





(8) Engr. Muhammad Yaqoob Naeem

Manager Project (PIAC)

Allama Iqbal International Airport, Lahore

Ph: 903 44456



(9) Mr. Wesley King

Cargo Manager

Allama Iqbal International Airport, Lahore

Ph: 663 2363



(10) Mr. Tariq Saleem

Manager Cargo (Admin)

Allama Iqbal International Airport, Lahore

Ph: 663 9361



(11) Mr. Zakawat Ul Hassan

Airport Manager

Civil Aviation Authority

Allama Iqbal International Airport, Lahore

Ph: 904 0508 PABX: 924 0601

Fax: 661 1507



(12) Mr. Shaukat Ali Awan

Chief Meteorologist

Pakistan Meteorological Department

(Ministry of Defence),

Government of Pakistan

Flood Forecasting Division, 46 – Jail Road,
Lahore-54000

Ph: 920 0208 Fax: 920 0209

Cell: 0300 446 2808



(13) Mr. Tahir Malik

Vice Chairman

Air Cargo Agents Association of Pakistan

Suit # 1, 2nd Floor, Sharjah Centre, Shadman
Market, Lahore

Ph: 111 872 326 Fax: 587 1166, 587 1172



(14) Mr. Naved Arif

Director General

Export Promotion Bureau, GoP

62 – Garden Block, Garden Town, Lahore

Ph: 903 0652 & 3 UAN: 111 444 111

Fax: 923 0608


(15) Mr. Shahid Hamid Khawaja

President

Lahore Customs Agents Group

Customs Dry Port, Mughalpura, Lahore

Ph: 721 0125, 724 0125, 724 6272, 843 5775
Fax: 723 5507

Cell: 0333 422 5535



(16) Mr. Riaz Ahmed Qaiser

General Secretary

Lahore Customs Agents Group (LCAG)

Convener Standing Committee on AFU
(LCCI)

Cargo Complex, Allama Iqbal International
Airport, Lahore

Ph: 663 3874 Cell: 0333 421 1910



(17) Mr. S. Ashfaq Hussain Bukhari

Director

Prime Freight Systems (Pvt) Limited

76 – Shadman Colony # 1, Lahore

Ph: 755 1812 & 3, 755 2357 & 8 Fax: 755
0206 Cell: 0320 481 1180

(18) Mian Muhammad Sarwar Javaid

Proprietor

Basaltic Trading Consultants

50-G, LDA Flats, Block N,

Model Town Ext., Lahore

Ph: 516 1715 Cell: 0300 840 3341

Faisalabad:

(1) Mr. Mansoor Alam

Inspector

Customs & Central Excise

Faisalabad

Cell: 0300 667 4075



(2) Mr. Safdar Awan

District Manager Faisalabad

Air Blue

Shop No.14, Kohinoor 1 Plaza, Jarranwala
Road, Faisalabad.

Ph: 854 4905, 854 5528

Cell: 0300 866 0521

(3) Mr. Kashif Elahi

District Manager Marketing & Airport Ops.

Aero Asia

37, Regency Arcade, The Mall, Faisalabad

Ph: 264 1092, 262 7023 &4, 262 3503

Fax: 257 7805

Airport: 257 7804 5528



(4) Mr. Asem Khurshid

Director - Khurshid Spinning Mills &

Chief Executive - A K Exports

133, Regency The Mall, Faisalabad

Ph: 261 0025 - 30 Fax: 261 0027



(5) Mr. Tahir Mahmood

Deputy Manager Finance

Civil Aviation Authority

Faisalabad International Airport, Faisalabad

Ph: 257 8384 PABX: 257 7841 – 44 Ext: 203
Cell: 0300 865 2587



(6) Mr. Amanuallah Alvi

Airport Manager & 1st Class Magistrate,

Civil Aviation Authority

Faisalabad International Airport,

Faisalabad

Ph: 257 8827 PABX: 257 7841 – 44

Ext: 201 Fax: 257 8657



(7) Mr. S H Owais Jafri

AFO

Civil Aviation Authority

Faisalabad International Airport,

Faisalabad

Ph: 257 7841 Ext: 237 Cell: 0333 650 9471



(8) Mr. Manzoor ul Hassan

Station Manager

Pakistan International Airlines

Faisalabad International Airport, Faisalabad

Ph: 257 7745 Fax: 257 7876

Cell: 0301 865 0385



(9) Syed Jawad Hussain

Director

Export Promotion Bureau, GoP

Gulistan Colony # 2, Sheikhupura Road,
Faisalabad

Ph: 921 0287










Sialkot:

(1) Mr. Ayaz Mahmood

Deputy Director

Export Promotion Bureau, GoP

Paris Road, Sialkot

Ph: 925 0081, 925 0083 Fax: 925 0082



(2) Mr. Muhammad Nawaz Ch.

General Manager

Sialkot International Airport

95 – A, Muradia Road, Model Town Sialkot

Ph: 355 5333, 325 7181 & 2

Fax: 325 7834 Cell: 860 2828

Multan:

(1) Mr. Aleem Sattari

Cargo Sales Manager

Pakistan International Airlines

65 – Abdali Road,

Multan

Ph: 920 0069, 920 0024 Ext: 212

Fax: 920 0071



(2) Mr. Khawaja Muhammad Yousuf

Chairman

Pakistan Tanners Association

Shaheed Yunus Dastgir Road,

Multan

Ph: 512 201

Fax: 512 911, 573 611

(3) Mr. Khawaja Muhammad Abdullah

President

The Multan Chamber of Commerce & Indistry

Shahrah-e-Aiwan-e-Tijarat-o-Sanat,

Multan.

Ph: 454 3530, 451 7087

Fax: 457 0463

(4) Mr. G A Bhatti

Secretary

The Multan Chamber of Commerce &
Indistry

Shahrah-e-Aiwan-e-Tijarat-o-Sanat,

Multan

Ph: 451 7087, 454 3530

Fax: 457 0463 Cell: 0300 731 1934

 Quetta:

(1) Mr. Qamar Anjum

Deputy Director

Export Promotion Bureau

Shara-e-Iqbal, Quetta

Ph: 081-9201109 Fax: 081-9202053



(2) Engr. Maqbool Ahmed Qazi

Chief Technical Officer

Civil Aviation Authority

Quetta Air Port

Shara-e-Iqbal, Quetta

Ph: 081-2880233, 081-2880213-17 Fax:
081-2880211





(3) Mr. Khalid Bashir

Airport Manager

Quetta Air Port

Shara-e-Iqbal,

Quetta



(4) Mr. Muhammad Siddque Kakar

President

Chamber of Commerce & Industry, Quetta

Quetta

Ph: 081-2821943, 2835717

Fax: 081-2821948

(5) Mr. Mohammad Ahmed Durrani

Secretary

Chamber of Commerce & Industry, Quetta

Quetta

Ph: 081-2821943, 2835717

 Fax: 081-2821948



(6) Mr. Shahid Latif Paracha

Chief Executive

City Express Logistics, Quetta

Suite # 10, Usman Complex,

First Floor, Shara-e-Haji, Model Town,
Quetta.

Ph: 081-2834632-40 Fax: 081-2831287
Cell: 0321-8040802

Email: slparacha@citiexpress.com.pk.
www.cityexpress.com.pk




(7) Mr. Tariq ul Haq Mian

Station Manager

Pakistan International Airlines

Quetta

Ph: 081-9203869

(8) Mr. Amjad Hussain

Incharge Cargo

Pakistan International Airlines

Quetta

Ph: 081-9203869

Gwadar:



(1) Mr. Ahmed Bakhsh Lehri

Director General

Gwadar Development Authority

Governor House Road, Gwadar

Ph: 081-9201675, 086-0864-211775, 0864-
2100953 Fax: 0864-210953

Cell: 0300-3821193



(2) Mr. Iftikhar Ahmed

Airport Manager

Gwadar International Airport

Gwadar

Ph: 086-4315046-47 – Fax: 086-4315048

Cell: 0333-2283512



(3) Mr. Muhammad Iqbal Baloch

District Sales Manager

Pakistan International Airlines

Gwadar

Ph: 086-210951, 210060, 210952

Cell: 0300-2064087



(4) Mr. Naveed Ahmed

Executive Engineer / XEN

Gwadar Port Authority

Ministry of Ports & Shipping, Govt. of
Pakistan, Gwadar

Ph: 021-9204434-42, 086-4210064, 086-
4210073 – Fax: 086-4210075, 021-9204447

Cell: 0300-2662400

(5) Capt. A. Raziq Durrani

Director Operations

Gwadar Port Authority

Ministry of Ports & Shipping, Govt. of
Pakistan, Gwadar/Karachi

Ph: 021-9204434-42, 086-4210064, 086-
4210073 – Cell: 0300-9249109

Email: raziqd@yahoo.com



(6) Mr. M. Asghar Aziz Sanjarani

President

Gwadar Chamber of Commerce & Industry

GCCI House, Gwadar, Balochistan

Ph: 0864-212192

Karachi Address:

Wachani Village, Street No.2, Maula Madad
Bus Stop,

Chakiwara Shershah Road, Lyari Town,
Karachi

Ph: 021-2548344 021-2548345,

Cell: 0300-3572508




National Trade and Transport Facilitation Committee

(A standing Committee established by the Ministry of Commerce, Government of Pakistan)





 NTTFC Secretariat, 1st Floor, Azeem Avenue Tel : +92-21-524 2568 - 69

 2-C 13-Lane, Bukari Commercial Area, Fax : +92-21-524 2570

 Khayaban-e-Shujaat, DHA Phase VI, Website : www.nttfc.org

 Karachi Email : nttfc@cyber.net.pk



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